Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for science and society Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

5 June 2020

#AGURocks: Times Zones

Music has been important to me for as long as I’ve been interested in science. I never really had any music training. In high school, I constantly blared CDs in the background while working on homework (so much 90s alternative and punk rock). Often taking breaks just to focus and listen intently to the music (and procrastinate) but I started to dream of playing music.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


3 June 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Go Forth and Science

Art is a thing I was really into when I was younger; I was totally that kid who took art classes outside of school, drew on napkins (and myself), and doodled in the margins of all my notebooks. But then I went to college, got sucked into the wonderful world of science, and let drawing fall off my list of usual activities.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


1 June 2020

Getting our message across with Water Pistols and a little bit of Poetry!!

As scientists we are all beginning to understand the importance of communicating our work to a wider audience than just our peers. Engaging the public helps us to dispel myths, create interest, educate and hopefully inspire the next generation of scientists. It’s also really good fun and adds a little variety to your work. So now I could be sitting at my desk one day and the next stood in front of large crowd brandishing water pistols and waving Lego figures at them. 

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


29 May 2020

#AGURocks: Cover of the Science Mag

Ever since Nick Shackleton first showed his clarinette skills on one of the first ICP conferences (most likely on the ICP3 in Cambridge) it has become a habit to have a Paleomusicology concert the night before the conference ends. It used to be quite classical but it has become more casual during the last years.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


22 May 2020

#AGURocks: Physical Geography (i.e. Bohemian Rhapsody)

#AGURocks is a series of posts by musicians who create science-inspired music and explain their process and inspiration while also showcasing their pieces. Learn more about contributing. The views and lyrics expressed in this post and song do not reflect those of Sharing Science and AGU. This week, Rob Storrar. Back in March I woke up with, for no discernible reason, the opening lines to Queen’s epic Bohemian Rhapsody in my head, …

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


13 May 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: The Earth Talking

I am fascinated by the overlaps between art and science, which feel particularly salient within geoscience. This project, “dialogue: the earth talking,” grew out of my deep fascination with the intersections of art and geology, and the marks that humans generally, and I specifically, make on land.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


4 May 2020

Introducing #AGURocks & #DrawnToGeoScience

…today we’re introducing the #AGURocks and #DrawnToGeoScience campaigns. We want to hear your songs and see your drawings. And we want to learn about the inspiration and processes behind them. We’re hoping to not only showcase your works but also provide some inspiration for aspiring artists and musicians out there.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


13 April 2020

Voice for Science: A Welcome with Advice from Alumni

In 2018, AGU launched Voices for Science, a program that centers around training scientists to address the critical need for communicating the value and impact of Earth and space science to key decision makers, journalists, and public audiences. The program recruits scientists to participate in one of two tracks: policy or communications.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


30 March 2020

Geoscientists can help: Leveraging your science and communication skills to help tackle COVID19

Are you struggling, as a geoscientist, with what you can do to be useful during the Corona Crisis? Here is something that might help: If you are a geoscientist, you are also a scientist and probably a science communicator, and you can use both of those facts to help those around you find, understand, and share the latest information about the virus. Probably the best thing we can do as geoscientists is leverage our skills and training to share and amplify the important messages from the public health community.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


2 March 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 2: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

As a recap; home for Christmas holidays, having a nice conversation with my in-laws. My father-in-law’s wife voices skepticism about climate change. Part 1 of this blog talked about what I could learn from that skepticism, and how listening might guide future climate research.  Part 2, this part, is about how I could’ve shared some of the things I’ve learned about climate science.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>