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7 October 2020

Sharing Science scicomm workshops are now virtual!

By Shane M Hanlon We in Sharing Science do many different things. We’re scicomm trainers/practitioners, communicators, multimedia experts, artists, storytellers, and more. At the core of these various aspects of scicomm is the first item – training. Sharing Science was founded >5 years ago by my colleague Olivia with the goal of providing fellow scientists with the skills, tools, and resources they need to communicate science with any audience. The …

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25 September 2020

Drawn to Geoscience: Crowdsourced science at the intersection of art and science

Today, I am an interdisciplinary researcher, environmentalist, artist, and educator that employs art-based research methods in tandem with Western science methods to study environmental issues in the field. But life didn’t start out that way.

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17 August 2020

International Observe the Moon Night: An Opportunity for Global Outreach

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public engagement program that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of our Moon and its connection to planetary science and exploration. It is also a time to celebrate our personal and cultural connections to Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor.

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11 August 2020

Advocating for climate science

A growing number of scientists in the United States are politically active and engaged, especially around issues affecting science. And researchers have the right to participate in advocacy, even if they work for federal agencies or state-funded institutions. Despite this, we at the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund frequently speak with scientists deterred from advocacy after hearing of well-meaning colleagues who’ve been accused, for example, of violating anti-lobbying laws for writing an op-ed.

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5 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Imaginations to animations

As a kid, I could sit quietly for hours entertaining myself if I were handed a pen and a paper. Now as an adult, I still find myself doodling and sketching when I’m bored, or when I’m trying to explain something. Putting imaginations and thoughts into drawings is apparently a useful skill later in life, also as a scientist. Illustrating processes and how things work, even in the most basic form, is a useful science communication tool. 

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3 August 2020

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator.

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator. There. I admit it.

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31 July 2020

#AGURocks: Rocking natural history, ecology and evolution

Is it unusual for a Boomer full professor to pick up a ukulele and learn how to play – I can’t really answer that question but I can tell you it’s been a fun ride…

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27 July 2020

Two scientists walk into a bar

Every few months, fifty scientists head out to bars around San Diego. Well, fifty more than a usual Thursday night. The event is called Two Scientists Walk Into A Bar and, more than just the start to a corny joke, it’s a science communication program designed to reveal scientists as the mere mortals we are.

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24 July 2020

Zoonotic Diseases: Plugging the Source Before the Flood

A whopping seventy-five percent of emerging diseases have been said to be zoonotic, meaning that such diseases can spread from wildlife to humans, an example being our current pandemic consisting of Covid-19 a bat-to-human infection.

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23 July 2020

Reduction of Ice Extent in Arctic Region Cause PDV Transmission Between Arctic and Pacific Region

This article focuses on reduction of sea ice extent in Arctic region which is caused by climate change might introduce many diseases that are locked in Arctic to sub-Arctic regions. The virus they track is called Phocine distemper disease (PDV), and it is a pathogen that majorly causes high rate of mortality in European harbor seals of northern Atlantic Ocean.

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