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6 January 2020

Fall Meeting was amazing. What now?

Now that the holiday season is (largely) over, we’re reflecting here at Sharing Science on the successes of Fall Meeting and where we go from here.

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2 December 2019

SciComm, policy, and outreach at AGU19!

♩It’s the most, wonderful tiiiiiiiime, of the year! ♫ 

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15 November 2019

Introducing “Sci & Tell” – a…well…not really a podcast…

Shane M Hanlon  AGU’s 2017 Fall Meeting, we partnered for Story Corps as part of AGU’s Centennial to record audio stories from scientists in the Story Corps model. From that seed, we kept the program going as the Narratives Project:  The AGU Centennial is an opportunity to reflect on our past and welcome all the possibilities that the next century will bring. To capture where we’ve been and where we’re going, …

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12 November 2019

Scicomm adventures in South Africa

Science communication is critical to inspiring future generations, which I only realised at the beginning of this year after attending the Famelab scicomm workshop at Wits. My involvement in Famelab and Science Slam was incredible.

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19 September 2019

Storytelling basics: The story arc

By Shane M Hanlon  All good stories have an arc.* A beginning, middle, end. The action goes up and down. The tension leads to twists and turns. So, what does the basic story arc look like? Well:   This is an arc. Or, at this point, it’s a line. The beginning of the arc is the beginning of the story. Set the scene: where are we? Who are the characters? …

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30 August 2019

Storytelling basics: A (mini) series

I’m a professional storyteller. It’s a weird thing to say and has been a weirder realization to come to. But, it’s true.

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10 July 2019

Hey, farmer, farmer, put away the DDT now

Music has often been used as an outlet for activists to reach a broader audience on issues concerning politics, social issues, and environmental crises. Joni Mitchell was a prominent and very influential recording artist in the 1970’s that embodied this idea of using music to educate the public.  One of her most popular songs “Big Yellow Taxi,” called out various environmental issues like deforestation and, what stood out the most to me, the use of DDT.k

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23 May 2019

Take your lab to the ocean!

Calling all Ocean Scientists: with World Oceans Day fast approaching, and in celebration of AGU’s Centennial, we want to highlight the experiences you and your teams have out in the field!

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22 April 2019

Connecting Kids to Real World Science through Children’s Books

Many science education projects for elementary school age kids start with the assumption that, in order to get kids interested in the science, there needs to be a character like “Barbara Bacteria” or “Larry the Lava Flow” to get their attention. In my over twenty years of experience as a science educator and children’s author, I feel confident in saying that this is not the case.

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1 April 2019

Embedding science within the art world

Art and science are often seen as complete opposites: art is subjective, while science aims to discover objective facts about nature. But more and more, we are realising that there are commonalities between the two and art-science collaborations have become more common. From the scientists’ perspective, such efforts can potentially reach audiences outside of the scientific echo chamber, however, it’s not always clear whether they always successfully do this in practice.

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