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8 March 2021

#VirtualFieldtrips: a supplementary educational tool in Covid-19 times

A virtual fieldwork can be useful in classes where students have the opportunity for a quick and realistic “visit” to a particular study area.

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5 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: Sanna’s Reindeer

Sanna Vannar is the president of Sáminuorro, the Swedish Association of Young Saami.  The Saami people span four nations: Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Russia. Sanna’s family have been reindeer herders for generations, which puts them in a unique position to evaluate the reindeer’s response to the changing northern climate.

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2 March 2021

Social Science, Social Media, and Serendipity

What could possibly have motivated me to boldly attempt a social science research project in the middle of a geophysics PhD? Serendipity.

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26 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Canaries in the Coal Mine

When it come to climate change and its impact on the animal world, there’s more than one “canary in the coal mine.” To mix a few potent metaphors, the dominoes are falling — and, if it’s true that God is in the details, it’s fair to say that individual animals help tell the story.  As I work to make climate change science accessible and comprehensible through #AntarcticLog, I’ve found myself leaning on keystone species.  The assortment featured here tell separate stories about the effects of global warming, and they add up to a clear picture of what’s happening. 

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22 February 2021

Keeping socially connected with science podcasts

March 2020 may have marked the closure of gates to physical spaces for science engagement, but it also opened the portal to new social spaces to keep the science conversations going. This is exactly what happened to my institution and a local arboretum, where an existing partnership that relied upon on-site programming found a new way to continue and grow our collaborations.

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19 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Ivan the Terrabus

Finally, lest you think my life is all blissful polar adventure, let me share a regret: I have not yet ridden in Ivan the Terrabus, the most excellent vehicle that carries people from the airstrip to the home-away-from-home  known as Mactown — McMurdo Station.  

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12 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Classics 

Who’s reading #AntarcticLog comics?  Lots of different people actually. At first I thought it was just my friends and family, but as I began to cover the work of particular scientists, it caught the attention of the science community, as well.  Science communicators paid attention, and — sure enough — Antarctica worked its magic on the general population, especially teachers and their students.    

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8 February 2021

Lights, Camera, Action! Video content production and dissemination during distance learning

As much of the world’s population sheltered in place during the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists and organizations stepped forward to create and share ‘zero-budget’ educational video content directly with students and the public. Using only phones, computer cameras, video conferencing apps and tools readily available to us as geoscience professionals, we created video content covering topics ranging from rock identification and interpretation, to the physics of hazards and geotravel.

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5 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Not the antarctic

As I studied up on phytoplankton, the subject of my team’s research at Palmer, I recalled an earlier trip, in the Arctic, where I had the chance to see diatoms unknown to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute scientist Sam Laney running the Imaging Flow Cytobot as we traveled through the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas. 

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28 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: Adequate Earth

#AntarcticLog was my primary project under the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers Program.  This week, a group of artists and writers from this program are doing something big, and I wanted to tell you about it.  

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