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7 May 2019

Roman mining activities polluted European air more heavily than previously thought

Roman-era mining activities increased atmospheric lead concentrations by at least a factor of 10, polluting air over Europe more heavily and for longer than previously thought, according to a new analysis of ice cores taken from glaciers on France’s Mont Blanc.

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7 January 2019

Colorado’s Lake Dillon is warming rapidly

The surface waters of Lake Dillon, a mountain reservoir that supplies water to the the Denver area, have warmed by nearly 5 degrees Fahrenheit (2.5 degrees Celsius) in the last 35 years, which is twice the average warming rate for global lakes. Yet surprisingly, Dillon does not show adverse environmental changes, such as nuisance algal blooms, often associated with warming of lakes.

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10 December 2018

New insights into the diets of Neanderthals

Today at 4 pm EST, AGU is holding the first of its kind “Geoscience Grab Bag” press conference at Fall Meeting 2018.

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27 August 2018

Scientists find corals in deeper waters under stress too

Coral reefs around the world are threatened by warming ocean temperatures, a major driver of coral bleaching. Scientists routinely use sea-surface temperature data collected by satellites to predict the temperature-driven stress on reef communities, but new research shows that surface measurements alone may not accurately predict the full extent of thermal stress on deeper corals.

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25 June 2018

Found: Missing Mexican Aurora

By Larry O’Hanlon A scientist and a historian have teamed up to fill in a conspicuous hole in the story of the most intense and famous geomagnetic storm in recent history. The Carrington Event struck on September 1, 1859, when a coronal mass ejection erupted from the Sun and struck Earth. The resulting geomagnetic storm set off a vast display of the Aurora Borealis, the Northern Lights, on September 2 …

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30 May 2018

Seismometer readings could offer debris flow early warning

Instruments designed to record earthquakes revealed information about debris-flow speed, the width of the flow and the size of boulders carried by the January 2017 mudslide in Montecito, California, and the location of the event, suggesting that the current generation of seismometers in the field could be used to provide an early warning of an incoming debris flow to residents in mudslide-prone areas.

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6 April 2018

Early climate action has big effect on rising sea levels

Rising sea levels will accelerate this century and beyond, exposing hundreds of millions of people to flooding and other coastal hazards by the year 2300. But acting early to lower greenhouse gas emissions can slow that rise, say scientists in two new studies in Earth’s Future, an open access journal published by the American Geophysical Union.

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16 October 2017

Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth

Scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals emanating from lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. And as a small, constant source of seismic energy in the surrounding earth, lake microseisms can shine a light on the geology surrounding a lake.

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9 August 2017

Rapidly rising seas: Scientists discover cause of Atlantic coastline’s sea level rise hot spots

Sea level rise hot spots — bursts of accelerated sea rise that last three to five years — happen along the U.S. East Coast thanks to a one-two punch from naturally occurring climate variations, a new study shows.

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31 July 2017

Bacteria found near abandoned mines could shed light on early Earth

Acidified water draining from abandoned mines, studied primarily as a modern environmental hazard, may offer insight into the oxygenation of Earth’s early atmosphere and development of life on other planets, according to a new study.

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