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14 March 2016

Waiting for the weather to clear

On Sunday afternoon, we headed back to Newport. The scientists and crew were closely watching the weather to see when we will be able to head back on the water. The down time gives Goni and his team some time to filter water samples that were collected from the Newport Hydrographic Line on Friday. The samples are one piece of a larger project trying to figure out how small coastal rivers are influencing coastal ocean productivity during the winter.

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12 March 2016

Out on the Ocean

We finally headed out on the ocean Friday morning. Unfortunately, bad weather is rolling in this weekend so we’re going to head back in Friday night. We’ll hopefully get back out on Monday. Despite only being a day trip, I still got some flavor for being on a research cruise, including feeling a little queasy around lunchtime. But I spent some time outside and I felt much better. I am, hopefully, getting my sea legs.

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11 March 2016

Packing up and heading out

After a one-day delay due to bad weather, we finally headed out of Corvallis on Thursday afternoon. On the way to Newport, where the R/V Oceanus is docked, we stopped to take water samples from the Alsea River and estuary, which feed into the ocean. Miguel and his team are looking at how small rivers, like the Alsea, contribute nutrients to the coastal ocean that feed phytoplankton blooms during the winter.

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8 March 2016

Embarking on a research cruise

This week I will fly to Oregon to meet up with scientists from Oregon State University and embark on my first research cruise. I will be an observer aboard the R/V Oceanus, a mid-sized research vessel owned by the National Science Foundation and operated by OSU. We will be out on the ship for a week, traveling up and down the Pacific Northwest coast, and I’ll be blogging, taking pictures and shooting video to capture both the research being done and the experience of being aboard a research ship.

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7 August 2013

Of Stars and Stripes: Satellites Used to Predict Zebra Migrations

One of the world’s longest migrations of zebras occurs in the African nation of Botswana, but predicting when and where zebras will move has not been possible until now. Using NASA rain and vegetation data, researchers can track when and where arid lands begin to green, and for the first time anticipate if zebras will make the trek or, if the animals find poor conditions en route, understand why they will turn back.

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