Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Climate Archives - GeoSpace.

13 February 2019

Mining climate models for seasonal forecasts

A team of scientists has figured out a shortcut way to produce skillful seasonal climate forecasts with a fraction of the computing power normally needed.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


11 January 2019

Barrier island sand dunes recover at different rates after hurricanes

Sand dunes on coastal barrier islands buffer the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts from oncoming hurricanes. Every year, millions of public and private dollars fund the restoration of these barrier islands, but managers often focus on the recovery of smaller sand dunes and aim at making them bigger, for better storm protection. But new research presented at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting last month finds sand dunes on these barrier islands don’t all recover at the same rate. Small dunes go back to becoming small dunes; large dunes recover to be large dunes; and they don’t typically grow larger than they were before the storm struck.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


9 January 2019

Scientists breathalyze cows to measure methane emissions

Cattle burps are the number two source of methane in the U.S., but it’s tricky to measure exactly how much methane one cow produces in a day. That’s why researchers at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory in Bushland, Texas set out to use a number of different methane assessment methods — including a “breathalyzer for cows” — to determine the methane emissions of free-range cattle on Oklahoma grasslands.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


7 January 2019

Colorado’s Lake Dillon is warming rapidly

The surface waters of Lake Dillon, a mountain reservoir that supplies water to the the Denver area, have warmed by nearly 5 degrees Fahrenheit (2.5 degrees Celsius) in the last 35 years, which is twice the average warming rate for global lakes. Yet surprisingly, Dillon does not show adverse environmental changes, such as nuisance algal blooms, often associated with warming of lakes.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


6 December 2018

Wintertime Arctic Sea Ice Growth Slows Long-term Decline: NASA

New NASA research has found that increases in the rate at which Arctic sea ice grows in the winter may have partially slowed down the decline of the Arctic sea ice cover. As temperatures in the Arctic have warmed at double the pace of the rest of the planet, the expanse of frozen seawater that blankets the Arctic Ocean and neighboring seas has shrunk and thinned over the past three decades. The end-of-summer Arctic sea ice extent has almost halved since the early 1980s. A recent NASA study found that since 1958, the Arctic sea ice cover has lost on average around two-thirds of its thickness and now 70 percent of the sea ice cap is made of seasonal ice, or ice that forms and melts within a single year. But at the same time that sea ice is vanishing quicker than it has ever been observed in the satellite record, it is also thickening at a faster rate during winter.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


17 October 2018

Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current

Long-term melting may lead to release of huge volumes of cold, fresh water into the North Atlantic, impacting global climate.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


28 September 2018

Ice age discovery may reveal early migration route of first Americans

Researchers discovered the retreat of an ancient ice sheet from the western coast of Canada occurred earlier than previously thought. Christopher Darvill and his co-authors studied the Cordilleran Ice Sheet in North America – which once covered an area the size of the Greenland Ice Sheet – to improve our understanding of past climate and ancient human migration.

Read More >>

2 Comments/Trackbacks >>