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You are browsing the archive for The Geo Model Blog Archives - The Field.

September 14, 2020

The interesting geologic setting of Thomas Cole’s “The Oxbow”

New from The Geo Models blog: “Earlier this year, I became aware of the longer, geographically-specific title and learned that the painting does portray a real location with a particularly interesting geologic context…. Cole’s vantage point on Mt. Holyoke is east-northeast.

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August 28, 2020

The Geo Models: Landslides associated with historic iron mining in the Virginia Valley and Ridge

The sharpness of these landslide features suggests they may still be slowly moving, but very little disruption to vegetation is visible in satellite imagery, so movement is probably very slow. Since their maximum age is known (the time of mining; late 1800s-1920s), they offer interesting comparison to older, natural landslides in the area, which tend to have softened, rounded features due to weathering and erosion.

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July 28, 2020

Fault-propagation folds in a sandbox model

New from The Geo Models: “These anticlines are recognizable as fault-propagation folds because the fault that offsets the deepest blue layer does not cut upward through the entire section. Displacement along the fault at depth is accommodated by folding of the overlying, un-faulted layers.”

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July 21, 2020

Is this Florida’s most famous landslide?

New from The Geo Models blog: “I asked Google and was rewarded with a vintage paper called…wait for it…’A Florida Landslide.’ Written in 1948 by Richard Jordan of Florida State, the paper describes a surprisingly impressive landslide that occurred in Gadsden County, Florida…”

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July 17, 2020

Anticlines and synclines in exhumed model rift basins

Several Mesozoic rift basins have been exhumed along the Atlantic margin of North America, creating interesting patterns in sedimentary rock layers and igneous intrusions that originated during the breakup of Pangaea.

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June 19, 2020

Fold-thrust belt outcrop pattern with doubly-plunging anticline

The latest post from The Geo Models blog.

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June 4, 2020

Looking for southern Appalachian rockfall scars using a high-resolution LiDAR dataset

I was able to find what I believe to be a few examples of “boulder tracks” using outstanding LiDAR hillshade imagery from the North Carolina Geological Survey. All features shown occur in generally gneissic bedrock on extensively forested slopes that have been logged within the last century.

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May 22, 2020

Slump landslide models, with some rock or debris avalanche characteristics

New from The Geo Models blog: “The model landslides in this post were produced at the same time as the Llusco landslide model I wrote about last year. They were created using a similar setup, but the slide masses behaved very differently during movement.”

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May 15, 2020

A simple rift basin sandbox model with normal faults

A simple model of a continental rift basin that develops some characteristics of the real thing can be made by constructing a layered sand cake on top of two overlapping sheets of paper, one of which is anchored to the underlying board, etc. This model setup will produce an asymmetric half-graben style of basin, which has a single, high displacement breakaway fault on one side and several smaller faults on the other.

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April 22, 2020

Listric normal faults with glass microbeads

Latest from from The Geo Models: Deformation associated with listric (downward flattening) normal faults produces very interesting patterns.

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