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You are browsing the archive for student scientist Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

21 October 2019

Living dead scattered across Alaska landscape

Their bodies cooling with the October air, wood frogs are now snug in leafy blankets all over Alaska. Down there inside those thumb-size frogs, even smaller creatures are hitching a ride. These tiny parasites have the power to make frogs develop up to a dozen extra legs, or no legs at all.

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29 August 2019

Celebrating 100,000 students doing field work on the Rio Grande

Since 1996 “100,000 students have walked the halls, tested in the labs, and hiked these trails,” observed Rep. Deb Haaland.

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10 June 2019

According to plan

After picking up the science team in Astoria, we headed back out to sea! This time we headed northward to the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of Washington State. The aim of this leg is to try to locate and recover fragments of a meteor strike recorded off the coast.

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4 June 2019

Sea trials and error

My love for the ocean began on the protected shore of Terrace Beach on Vancouver Island, surrounded by shorelines armored with rocky outcroppings that create structures for tide pools hundreds of organisms call home.

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23 May 2019

Oceanography in real-time: Undergraduates learn what it takes to do science at sea

Mud wasn’t the only thing students got their hands on. The undergraduates helped to sample the water column and ocean life at two deep locations (3,000 m and 600 m water depth) off the Oregon continental shelf, in addition to conducting a hydrographic survey along the Newport Hydrographic Line, a series of sampling stations that have been active for nearly 60 years.

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17 May 2019

Let’s get (Geo)physical

Dispatch: After spending a couple of days doing four hourly rotations around all of the labs, we got to choose which lab we would like to spend the next few days in, to collate all of the data for that lab, plot and analyse the data, and prepare a report for submission to the Chief Scientist for her to compile the overall Voyage Report.

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16 May 2019

Welcome to Monkey Island!

Dispatch: We’re the student team in charge of sea bird and marine mammal surveying from the observation deck, Monkey Island, as we complete a transit from Hobart to Fremantle across the Great Australian Bight.

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15 May 2019

Plankton……they have a face only a mother (or a scientist) could love!

Dispatch: One of the reasons we were interested in visiting this region of ocean was due to the presence of deep-sea canyons and the Bonney Upwelling off the coast of Discovery Bay.

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3 April 2019

Budding scientists communicate river science to elected officials in New Mexico

Last week, two 6th grade scientists and one 12th grade scientist took a trip to downtown Albuquerque to share the story of ongoing Rio Grande field science with city councilors and county commissioners….and, wow, did these students do a tremendous job!

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26 March 2019

Research cruise log: Artists-at-sea

Three artists join the crew to explore new perspectives on ocean science.

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25 January 2019

Breath-taking diversity

Discovering a ‘new’ species is a thrill and a privilege. The realization comes with a jolt of excitement: you may be the first person on Earth ever to set eyes on this creature! Many people never get to experience this rush…

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24 January 2019

Exploring the Costa Rican Depths with Costa Rican Eyes

Hello! I want to share part of my experience aboard the Falkor. It is not only my first time on this ship, but also my first time aboard a research vessel at all.

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5 December 2018

Conservation of our lobo, the Mexican gray wolf

Last Tuesday, a crew of 11 dedicated students left Albuquerque before the sun was even hinting at its return to the sky to help conserve one of the most endangered subspecies of wolves in the world: our lobo, the Mexican gray wolf.

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23 November 2018

The best inspiration is hand-on experience

Field scientists, I have decided, are the lucky ones. Unlike a variety of other professions, field scientists have the opportunity to travel to remote places and observe the wonders of the world, to see magnificent environmental beauty and escape boring everyday life, all in the name of science. I had the chance to be one of these lucky field scientists up in the Arctic in August 2018.

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15 November 2018

Turtle Trapping at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

While most students were enjoying an extended weekend in the middle of October, a dedicated crew of Bosque School and University of New Mexico (UNM) scholars spent four days trapping and taking genetic samples of freshwater turtles

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6 November 2018

My first experience on an oceanographic cruise

My name is Néstor Ramírez – I am a geological engineer who has been working on marine geology for 8 years, but on land! I have always worked with someone else’s data collected from the deep ocean…Not any more!

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5 November 2018

Management Strategies of a Senescing Rio Grande Cottonwood Bosque

The Rio Grande’s bosque, as we have come to know it across our lifetimes, is an ecological anomaly. The cottonwood gallery forest that stretches several hundred miles between the banks of the Rio Grande and its adjacent irrigation ditches is, generally speaking, comprised mostly of the same age class of trees.

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12 October 2018

Two Paths, One Destination

When the 6,000-pound remote-operated vehicle (ROV) is secure, we grab our buckets, eager to get our hands on fresh sediment cores. Collected from the sea floor just over 2,000 feet below us, these cores provide valuable insight into methane seep communities.

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21 August 2018

Tapir’s jaw an “incredibly rare” find

Thanks to her six-year-old grandson, Janet Klein of Homer recently hosted a few interesting house guests.

Five experts on ancient creatures slept in Klein’s Homer house last month as they searched local cliffs for another chunk of a mammal that lived in Alaska millions of years ago.

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17 August 2018

In the field with Albuquerque Sign Language Academy

Following the footsteps of crews of young adults from the deaf and hard of hearing community who work with Rocky Mountain Youth Corps (RMYC), this crew was created for individuals who want to engage with conservation and outdoor work but who are too young to participate in the RMYC crews.

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