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You are browsing the archive for ocean science Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

10 January 2018

Life in the deep blue

The surface of the ocean is a deep blue, with white-tipped waves crashing around the RV Investigator and towards the horizon.

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9 January 2018

Into the mud of the Great Australian Bight

The voyage brings together 20 students from universities all over Australia aboard the RV Investigator to learn and gain hands on experience in marine sciences. From a range of universities, we share our experience with grab sediment sampling.

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7 December 2017

Across the Front! An interdisciplinary perspective

After spending the first few days hugging the coast of the southern parts of Western Australia it is now time to let go of the protection of the land and venture further south.

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28 November 2017

Rookies at Sea

Have you ever been on a field trip to the middle of the Southern Ocean? Well, we – Peta Vine, Sam Wines, Ajinkya Koleshwar and Rhiannan Mundana – have done exactly that by participating in the CAPSTAN Program.

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23 November 2017

Fire Meets Water

Like a domino effect, several things happen to seawater when it comes in contact with a volcano.

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19 November 2017

What is so interesting about submarine volcanoes?

Jagged piles of molten rock, sulfurous smoke, exploding gaseous emissions, shifting landscapes, otherworldly creatures, scalding acidic fluids, swirling plumes of volcanic gasses and particles, and crushing pressure of the overlying sea: what is not to like about active submarine volcanoes?

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18 November 2017

Our first discovery!

Immediately after we collected the new bathymetric survey over West Mata, we gridded it and made a comparison to the last survey in March 2016. To our delight, two areas with large depth changes jumped out of the comparison.

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15 November 2017

Underwater Fire: A Changing Landscape

West Mata is a Restless Volcano. West Mata Seamount is one of only two submarine volcanoes in the world where an active eruption has been directly observed on the seafloor.

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14 November 2017

Underwater Fire: Studying the Submarine Volcanoes of Tonga

Why are the researchers searching for submarine volcanoes here? What do they hope to discover? How will they be searching?

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10 November 2017

Rising sea levels could weaken coral reefs’ protective influence on Brazil’s coast

Rising sea levels could diminish the ability of Brazil’s coral reef systems to weaken incoming ocean waves, resulting in stronger waves hitting populated areas on the Brazilian coastline, according to new research.

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11 October 2017

The Journey to the Heart of the Ocean

Mud, mud / Glorious mud. / Nothing quite like it for cooling the blood.

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28 September 2017

Planning to Get Underway

A typical research expedition has one or two chief scientists. Ours has 19…

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18 September 2017

Collecting unique data where the Atlantic Water meets the Arctic Ocean: A-TWAIN2017

Life on board RV Lance is very ‘koselig’ (cosy in Norwegian). Meals are served at fixed hours in the mess three times a day and coffee is always brewing.

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28 August 2017

Biodegradable microbeads may clean sunblock chemical from seawater

By Madeleine Jepsen Beach-goers around the world who slather on sunblock before an ocean swim can unwittingly contribute to coral-reef bleaching. Oxybenzone, a chemical in many types of sunblock and some hair products, can cause coral bleaching and death by damaging the coral’s genetic material, according to researchers. A team of scientists has proposed a new way to remove oxybenzone from the ocean by using tiny, absorbent beads to soak …

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8 August 2017

Tiny ocean waves could make large ice shelves crumble (plus VIDEO)

Small ocean waves could play a bigger role in breaking up ice shelves than tsunamis or other large waves, a new study suggests. A new study examining vibrations in Antarctica’s Ross Ice Shelf finds small waves continuously impacting the ice shelf may create enough strain to extend existing cracks in the ice and potentially create new ones. An ocean wave of 1 centimeter (0.5 inches) in height can cause vibrations that repeatedly move the ice more than 20 centimeters (8 inches).

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11 July 2017

Deep thoughts from the Deep Blue Sea

As far as I can see from the ship to the horizon there is nothing but deep blue sea. Not a single ship has passed within sight since we left the north shore of Oahu.

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27 June 2017

We Probably Should Have Waterproofed That: Swimming in Bubbles

One of the more unique environments in Dominica are the marine fumeroles (underwater gas seeps) that occur mere steps from the beach. There are a few locations on the island that display this phenomenon; one of which is the appropriately-named Champagne Beach.

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21 June 2017

Extraordinary storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss in 2016

Antarctic sea ice – frozen ocean water that rings the southernmost continent – has grown over the past few decades but declined sharply in late 2016. By March of 2017 – the end of the Southern Hemisphere’s summer – Antarctic sea ice had reached its lowest area since records began in 1978. Puzzled scientists wanted to know why.

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16 March 2017

New Technology Gives Insight to Ocean Color for NASA Satellites

NASA Scientists return to land on Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel Falkor after making important observations of phytoplankton with new technology to support current and future satellite observations.

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14 March 2017

High-Resolution Mapping Reveals the Evolution of Underwater Landscapes in the Johnston Atoll

The mapped region is almost the size of the state of Connecticut and falls within the recently expanded boundaries of a U.S. marine protected area. The area is populated with high-density deep-sea corals and sponges and is of great interest to researchers who view it as a stepping-stone between distinct marine ecosystems in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and the Central and South Pacific.

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