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You are browsing the archive for mapping Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

5 July 2022

The Tupul landslide: understanding the site

The Tupul landslide: archive Google Earth images provide interesting clues as to the causes of the tragedy that killed at least 47 people.

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11 October 2021

An updated landslide inventory map for Attica Region in Greece

A new web GIS platform recording the location and detailed of landslides has been recently constructed for the Attica region in Greece

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14 May 2020

The 2019 fatal landslide dataset

I have made the 2019 fatal landslide dataset available as a Google Sheet for the community to use, and welcome any corrections or additions

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7 March 2019

The Breaks rock slide: Revisiting Schultz and Southworth (1989) 30 years later

By Philip S. Prince, Virginia Division of Geology and Mineral Resources (Scroll down for summary video link) The Breaks rock slide, a large slide feature at the western edge of the Appalachian fold-thrust belt, was first described 30 years ago in Schultz and Southworth (1989). In an impressive display of imagery analysis and general geologic know-how, the authors successfully identified several large but topographically subtle ancient landslide features without the …

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26 February 2019

Some examples of the geology of “gaps” and travel on the early American frontier

The topographic features of the Powell Valley Anticline (PVA) played a significant role in the lives of both indigenous and Euro-American peoples on the American frontier in the late 18th century… Here I focus on two subjects inextricably connected to PVA topography: The Wilderness Road and Robert Benge, also known as Chief Benge, Captain Benge, Bob Benge, or simply “The Bench.” Benge and Wilderness Road users had two very opposite goals, leading to numerous clashes and Benge’s ultimate demise in the mountains of the PVA.

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11 February 2019

Hurricane Maria: a first analysis of landsliding in Puerto Rico

Detailed analysis by the USGS and others shows that Hurricane Maria triggered at least 40,000 landslides in Puerto Rico in 2017

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22 November 2018

Pre-failure analysis of the Fagraskogarfjall landslide

NPA Satellite Mapping have completed a pre-failure analysis of the Fagraskogarfjall landslide in Iceland using InSAR data. Up to 2 metres of movement occurred in the year before the main collapse.

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28 August 2018

Mapping global landslides

As part of our work on mapping the distribution of global landslides, Melanie Froude has set up an online GIS tool to visualise the data

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13 November 2017

New Antarctic heat map reveals sub-ice hotspots

An international team of scientists, led by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), has produced a new map showing how much heat from the Earth’s interior is reaching the base of the Antarctic Ice Sheet.

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5 May 2017

The Van Zandt landslide: another great example of landslide mapping using LIDAR

The Van Zandt landslide in Washington State: the value of LIDAR for mapping landslides in densely vegetated and difficult landscapes

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5 December 2016

Lidar – the amazing landslide mapping tool

An example from Washington State in the USA illustrates how Lidar is transforming the mapping of landslides in vegetated areas

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20 May 2016

The GFDRR ThinkHazard! tool

Yesterday the GFDRR launched its new ThinkHazard! tool, intended to provide high level mapping and advice on the likelihood of natural hazards in poor countries

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22 December 2015

Hydrothermal Hunt: Mapping Earth’s Ocean Seafloor

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. On this voyage, scientists aboard the research vessel Falkor hoped to shed light on the Mariana Back-arc. Read more posts here.

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9 November 2015

Tamu Massif: Closing thoughts from Chief Scientist Dr. William Sager

This is the last post in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise.

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2 November 2015

Mapping Tamu Massif one swath at a time

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise. Read more posts here.

As of the 29th of October 2015, the R/V Falkor has traveled 7544.9 km (4688.2 miles) and covered a total of 59,814.51 sq km (23094.5 sq miles) of the ocean seafloor. Our EM-302 multi-beam echo sounder has pinged 166,268 times collecting 71,827,776 soundings over a swath with an average width of 6781.29 m (4.21 miles). The deepest depth encountered so far is 7786.87 m (4.84 miles), and the average depth we are mapping is around 4448.74 m (2.76 miles). We have successfully completed Lines 1-8 and 14-17 and just began to survey Line 13. Even after almost a month of seeing the data streaming in, it is still exciting to see the features of Tamu Massif as the bathymetric/depth data is processed.

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22 October 2015

Studying Tamu Massif

We’re pleased to introduce a series of guest blog posts by Schmidt Ocean Institute’s Research team on their research vessel Falkor. Join us as we catch up with them and follow along on their expedition.

The Falkor is currently on a 36-day research trip. Her destination is Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located approximately 1500 kilometers (or 932 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau. During their journey, researchers will focus on collecting bathymetric and magnetic data that could help clarify how Tamu Massif, possibly the world’s largest single volcano, was formed.

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