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15 November 2017

Underwater Fire: A Changing Landscape

West Mata is a Restless Volcano. West Mata Seamount is one of only two submarine volcanoes in the world where an active eruption has been directly observed on the seafloor.

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14 November 2017

Underwater Fire: Studying the Submarine Volcanoes of Tonga

Why are the researchers searching for submarine volcanoes here? What do they hope to discover? How will they be searching?

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6 November 2017

Rio Research Roundup

High school biology students have been working hard studying the wildlife of the Rio Grande. This is one New Mexico student’s report.

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3 November 2017

When Jerry Brown came to Nome

The California governor was stopping in Nome on his way to a meeting in Russia. The 79-year-old environmentalist and leader of a state that resembles a progressive nation wanted to learn why the far north matters. He had never been to the Arctic or Alaska before.

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2 November 2017

Unique imaging of a dinosaur’s skulls tells evolutionary tale

How could paleontologists peer inside the skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosaur to determine the size of this bone-crusher’s brain and the layout of other features…without damaging this rare, stunning and toothy treasure?

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1 November 2017

In Biblical Land, Searching for Droughts Past and Future

Perched on a cliff face in Israel’s Negev Desert, close to where the book of Genesis says the wicked cities of Sodom and Gomorrah were burned with divine fire, geologist Steven Goldstein was excitedly uncovering evidence of events even more ancient.

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27 October 2017

Biographer profiles scientist-explorer of northeast Alaska

In the early 1900s, Ernest Leffingwell lived for nine summers and six winters in a cabin on Flaxman Island, a wedge of sand off Alaska’s northern coast 58 miles west of Kaktovik.

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25 October 2017

Watching the Wolves

High school students Juli and Glen have been working hard the last few months developing and studying the effectiveness of enrichment items for captive Mexican gray wolves.

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16 October 2017

Getting ready for Antarctica

By Sarah Sams MAGIC-DML is an international collaboration focused on mapping, measuring, and modeling Antarctic geomorphology and ice change in Dronning Maud Land. The team has one austral field season under its belt and is in preparation for another this coming December through February. The week of October 2-8 was dedicated to preparing for the upcoming field season and reviewing progress from the previous one. The week began with a three-day …

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13 October 2017

Algae’s athletic role in glacier melt

Life exists everywhere you look. Even on glacier ice, home to inch-long worms, snow fleas, bacteria and algae.

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3 October 2017

Why do we monitor for tamarisk leaf beetles along the Rio Grande?

What an exciting summer it has been smacking salt cedar trees with an insect net!

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29 September 2017

Prehistoric reptile one mile above McCarthy

It started in 1963, when 23-year-old geologist David Whistler sat down for lunch on a rocky hilltop one mile above Kennicott Glacier…

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28 September 2017

Planning to Get Underway

A typical research expedition has one or two chief scientists. Ours has 19…

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27 September 2017

Inundation Investigations

It’s not often that you get to see mallards swimming amongst the trees in the bosque, or find fish swimming in the litterfall tubs…

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26 September 2017

Students begin monitoring the Rio Grande for the 2017-2018 school year!

This year we’ve got 24 schools working up and down the Rio Grande from Santo Domingo to Socorro.

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18 September 2017

Collecting unique data where the Atlantic Water meets the Arctic Ocean: A-TWAIN2017

Life on board RV Lance is very ‘koselig’ (cosy in Norwegian). Meals are served at fixed hours in the mess three times a day and coffee is always brewing.

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24 July 2017

A summer of student research and discovery

Each summer a wonderful group of teachers, staff and students converge on Bosque School’s campus to work as a team, to take care of each other and the environment, to think about bugs and observe snapping turtles!

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18 July 2017

The science before (and during) the storm – Part 2

Caught in the Storm By Robert Emberson Sampling landslides in the field varies in difficulty; some are high up on hillslopes or in the headwaters of steep catchments, while others tumble into easily accessed river valleys. When planning for such sampling, we had mainly anticipated that the weather would not be the biggest obstacle, but that’s what transpired for a major portion of our fieldwork in central Taiwan. The typical …

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17 July 2017

The science before (and during) the storm – Part 1

Setting the Scene By Robert Emberson Recently I was fortunate to participate in a fieldtrip to one of most interesting places I’ve ever worked – the central mountains of Taiwan. We were looking to sample the products of chemical weathering (the dissolution of rocks by fluid) within landslides, as well as their impact on the chemistry of the highly dynamic rivers draining these tropical mountains. We ended up getting caught …

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19 June 2017

Dispatches from field camp: Wrapping up

We spent the last week on a large-scale mapping project covering several miles in distance. Just before that started, I took 35 students on a 1-day trip through Yellowstone National Park, and I’m told that people in the park were asking if I was an official tour guide since I was walking the students through the geology at various stops.

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