Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for featured Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

17 August 2022

Giving students a survey on the first day? Think about what you are asking, and why

First-day survey responses can yield stepping stones to conversations and modifications with regards to our students and our courses. As instructors, we need to be mindful and thoughtful about the questions we ask, how we ask these questions, and what (if anything) we will do with those responses. 

Read More >>


16 August 2022

Kinked metavolcanics of the Castine Formation, eastern Maine

Callan shares a few outcrops from coastal Maine, part of the Avalonia terrane that accreted to ancestral North America during the Acadian Orogeny. They are volcaniclastic rocks, coarse and fine, and showing both overprinting kink bands and cross-cutting basaltic dikes.

Read More >>


15 August 2022

Secrets of an ancient horse of the Yukon

The Yukon — a territory of Canada east of the Alaska border — is a great place to find the preserved remains of ancient creatures. One reason is that the immense ice sheet that covered most of North America (including Chicago and New York City) did not press down on central Yukon nor the middle of Alaska. That spared the landscape from the abrasion of millions of pounds of flowing ice.

Read More >>


Book report

Five books get the Callan mini-review treatment: two novels from Amor Towles, an account of life in prison under solitary confinement, a history of Virginia slavery during the War of 1812, and finally a family account of the discovery of the fossil Hesperornis, a toothed bird, and various associated tangents.

Read More >>


12 August 2022

15-Ice: Birds foretelling climate change

Anant Pande is an Indian polar researcher who studies snow petrels –  shy pelagic (sea-faring) birds who nest on rock crevices in Antarctica. These endemic birds prefer to nest near less icy waters. Climate change has melted polar oceans and perhaps made it less energy intensive — as they have to fly shorter distances to find non-frozen oceans.

Read More >>


#AntarcticLog: Diving on the Mid-Cayman Rise

Leg 2 of the Alvin Science Verification Expedition finds us once again exploring new territory. After all, that’s the point of certifying Alvin to dive 6500 meters — to give us access to much more of the sea floor.  Today we’re diving on the Mid-Cayman Rise, a spreading center in the Earth’s crust at the deepest point in the Caribbean.  

Read More >>


5 August 2022

Alaska lexicon sinks in over the years

When my little Ford pickup chugged into Alaska 36 years ago this month, I didn’t know a wheel dog from a dog salmon. You could have told me the North Slope was connected to the Panhandle by the Chain and I would have believed you…. I could have avoided that awkwardness if I had possessed the Dictionary of Alaskan English.

Read More >>


#AntarcticLog: Greetings from the Puerto Rico Trench

Greetings from the deepest place in the Atlantic Ocean!  So far I’m reporting from the surface, but every day human-operated vehicle (HOV) Alvin carries scientists deeper. I mean, if you knew you had access to 99% of the seafloor — where before you had access to 2/3 — wouldn’t you head for the deepest spots?

Read More >>


The Imamzadeh Dawood mudflow disaster in Iran

The 27 July 2022 Imamzadeh Dawood mudflow disaster in the mountains near Tehran is one of a number of recent landslides in Iran.

Read More >>


14-Ice: Glacier tourism on thin ice

Glaciers around the world are melting because of climate change. Yet, while glaciers might be smaller than they once were, that’s not stopping tourists from flocking to see them.

Read More >>


4 August 2022

The 26 July 2016 landslide at Fushun west pit in China

On 26 July 2016 a 3.1 million cubic metre landslide occurred at a high wall coal mine at Fushun in China, causing extensive damage. The failure is documented in a new paper (Sun et al. 2022) in the journal Landslides.

Read More >>


3 August 2022

The 2 December 2020 Beach Road Landslide in Haines, Alaska

A new open access paper (Darrow et al. 2022) describes the 2 December 2020 Beach Road landslide in Haines, Alaska, which killed two people.

Read More >>


30 July 2022

Well-preserved mudcracks in Belt argillite, Glacier National Park, Montana

Fresh from the field, Callan shares a quintet of beautifully preserved desiccation cracks in Mesoproterozoic Belt Supergroups sediments, exposed in Montana’s geological gem, Glacier National Park.

Read More >>


29 July 2022

This North Carolina boulder carved a satisfying track as it slid downhill, and you can see it with lidar imagery

By Philip S. Prince A few weeks ago, after years of “lidar surfing,” I finally encountered an Appalachian boulder that left clear evidence of its sliding path down a mountainside. Large boulders are common throughout all of topographically rugged Appalachia, but they typically reveal little or no evidence about their paths from upslope sources to their current resting places. This Macon County, North Carolina, boulder is a rare exception, as …

Read More >>


A high-country Eden for sockeye salmon

In late summer, a few months before this mossy valley will feel the sting of 40-below air, bright red salmon dart through a crystal-clear pool amid fragrant green vegetation. The Gulkana Hatchery has a Garden-of-Eden feel, which is fitting since millions of sockeye salmon begin life here each year.

Read More >>


NORTH CASCADE GLACIER CLIMATE PROJECT 2022-39th Annual Field Program

Mount Baker camp for Rainbow and Sholes Glacier (Illustration by Megan Pelto) Science Director: Mauri S. Pelto, [email protected] Art Director: Jill Pelto, [email protected] 2022 Field Season: For the 39th consecutive summer we are heading into the field to measure and communicate the impact of climate change on North Cascade glaciers. We will complete detailed measurements on 10 glaciers, three of which are part of the World Glacier Monitoring Service reference glacier network …

Read More >>


#AntarcticLog: Down with Alvin

Down with Alvin!  That’s where the scientists aboard R/V Atlantis are headed.  As Alvin Science Verification Expedition chief scientist Adam Soule says, “our human brain is good at seeing what’s different in an environment — anything from organic shapes to unusual colors.” 

Read More >>


13-Ice: The ice ships of Project Habbakuk

Dive down into the freezing depths of Patricia Lake, in Alberta’s Jasper National Park, and you will find the wreck of the Habbakuk—a sixty-foot model battleship originally constructed of wood and ice.

Read More >>


28 July 2022

AGU applauds passage of bipartisan U.S. innovation bill

AGU, the world’s largest Earth and space science association, applauds the bipartisan effort by Congress to pass the CHIPS and Science Act, which represents one of the largest investments in U.S. science and technology in decades. The legislation, which was modified from a larger package of bills, now includes the semiconductor-focused CHIPS Act, along with a package of measures that will authorize science agencies, such as the National Science Foundation …

Read More >>


What Inclusive Instructors Do – a book from Stylus Publishing

The themes of “equity and belonging” are present throughout the book, emphasizing that instructors can design learning environments for all students to reach their potential within a welcoming space that fosters a sense of belonging.

Read More >>