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28 November 2017

Submarine Volcanoes of Tonga: What is the point?

An unrelenting love for discovery drives the scientists’ quest. Dr. Chadwick smiles when he says, “I love the thrill of figuring something out for the first time, like looking at a landscape and interpreting how it was formed.”

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26 November 2017

Underwater Fire – Week 2 Video

“On these expeditions, I always have to remind myself that what we are seeing on the video screen or computer monitor is not somewhere else – it is right under our feet!”

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24 November 2017

Where there is smoke…

The chemistry of seawater around volcanoes is different from that of the rest of the ocean. When the team runs into these differences over a volcano, they are most likely from a hydrothermal source.

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23 November 2017

Fire Meets Water

Like a domino effect, several things happen to seawater when it comes in contact with a volcano.

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19 November 2017

What is so interesting about submarine volcanoes?

Jagged piles of molten rock, sulfurous smoke, exploding gaseous emissions, shifting landscapes, otherworldly creatures, scalding acidic fluids, swirling plumes of volcanic gasses and particles, and crushing pressure of the overlying sea: what is not to like about active submarine volcanoes?

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18 November 2017

Our first discovery!

Immediately after we collected the new bathymetric survey over West Mata, we gridded it and made a comparison to the last survey in March 2016. To our delight, two areas with large depth changes jumped out of the comparison.

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15 November 2017

Underwater Fire: A Changing Landscape

West Mata is a Restless Volcano. West Mata Seamount is one of only two submarine volcanoes in the world where an active eruption has been directly observed on the seafloor.

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14 November 2017

Underwater Fire: Studying the Submarine Volcanoes of Tonga

Why are the researchers searching for submarine volcanoes here? What do they hope to discover? How will they be searching?

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16 March 2017

New Technology Gives Insight to Ocean Color for NASA Satellites

NASA Scientists return to land on Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel Falkor after making important observations of phytoplankton with new technology to support current and future satellite observations.

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14 March 2017

High-Resolution Mapping Reveals the Evolution of Underwater Landscapes in the Johnston Atoll

The mapped region is almost the size of the state of Connecticut and falls within the recently expanded boundaries of a U.S. marine protected area. The area is populated with high-density deep-sea corals and sponges and is of great interest to researchers who view it as a stepping-stone between distinct marine ecosystems in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and the Central and South Pacific.

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13 March 2017

A picture is worth a thousand words

The diversity of shapes and sizes in phytoplankton is overwhelming and beautiful. I was able to see the actual individuals that were in the sea surrounding us all the way across the Pacific. Seeing them first-hand made me realize how interrelated all things are on this planet: they may be invisible, but they are important. We are dependent on them and they on us.

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28 February 2017

Going with the flow

Trying to sleep on a trampoline while somebody is jumping on it – this is how it feels during many nights at sea as the ship zig-zags in an imaginary box around our drifting instruments in the North Pacific during winter. This is when biological activity is lowest, but clearly there is no absence of physical forces, such as waves. Clearly.

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16 February 2017

Letting Go and Looking Forward

As the bright yellow line and blinking strobe slip slowly down into the heaving waves, I feel a familiar sense of unease. Even though I have seventeen successful deployments of free-drifting, neutrally-buoyant sediment traps (or NBSTs) under my belt, it never feels quite normal to see the gray and orange float with its payload of painstakingly-prepared sample collectors sink away from the comparatively safe, solid deck of the ship.

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Video ~ Rough Recovery

Often, the “small victories” of a research cruise are what add up to a successful expedition. This video gives a great look into what many probably assume is an easy task: recovering samples and getting them on board Research Vessel Falkor.

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13 February 2017

Sea to Space Trek: Oceans, The Final Frontier

On board we have holographic microscope. (Yes, holographic!) In contrast to a normal microscope, the recorded holograms can refocus the microscopic image at different distances to the camera.

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1 February 2017

Taking Sail on a Creative Voyage from Sea to Space

I will do as they did, utilizing my 21st Century skills as scientific illustrator, designer and photographer, to explore and share the connections between nature, science, and art.

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23 January 2017

Closing Video – Eyes Below the Surface: Mapping Johnston Atoll

“This part of the ocean has never been mapped before… tens of millions of years – stories that have to be put together.” Our final #MappinTheFloor transit/cruise video explains what was accomplished and how members of the team will move forward with the data and discoveries!

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20 January 2017

A Student at Sea ~ Troubleshooting

Even as an early career scientist, I have learned that things seldom go as planned. Unforeseen obstacles, despite the stress, make science refreshingly exciting, interesting, and sometimes result in unexpected (important) discoveries.

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19 January 2017

Drawing You into Ocean Exploration with Multibeam

Check out this animated explanation of ocean exploration during the #MappinTheFloor expedition and Falkor’s multibeam!

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17 January 2017

Takeaways and Reflections

I have been asked a whole bunch of times by the crew, media representatives and 11th Hour Racing and Schmidt Ocean Institute representatives what my “takeaway” is. The short answer, “Wow, this has been an incredible experience!”

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