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You are browsing the archive for climate Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

27 January 2021

AGU statement on President Biden’s climate plan

We applaud the Biden Administration’s steps to remedy these challenges, as well as the disproportionate health and environmental effects suffered by underrepresented minorities.

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15 January 2021

AGU statement on President-elect Biden’s science nominations today

The issues that this team will be addressing – from COVID-19 to the climate crisis to removing systemic racism – are paramount to re-establishing a civil society that values science and facts. AGU’s community is ready to assist to foster a safe and healthy planet for all.

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24 December 2020

Top AGU news and views from 2020

As we look back on 2020, we wanted to share some of the top news and views coming out of AGU.

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17 December 2020

Highlights from Dec. 16 at #AGU20

Even though it was the second-to-last day at #AGU20, Wednesday was still very busy!

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15 December 2020

What to watch 16 Dec. at #AGU20

Wednesday is the second to last day of #AGU20, but we are not slowing down.

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10 December 2020

Day 7 of #AGU20: honoring our colleagues and learning about GeoHealth

Wednesday was another busy day at #AGU20 featuring sessions and events.

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4 June 2020

Hydrologists show environmental damage from fog reduction is observable from outer space

A new paper presents the first clear evidence that the relationship between fog levels and vegetation status is measurable using remote sensing. The discovery opens up the potential to easily and rapidly assess fog’s impact on ecological health across large land masses — as compared to painstaking ground-level observation.

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18 May 2020

How climate killed corals

New study shows multiple factors joined forces to devastate the Great Barrier Reef in 2016.

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6 May 2020

Going against the trend

Global warming has affected the entire planet’s surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which until 2015 had bucked the trend. A research team has now unraveled what was going on.

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22 April 2020

The 50th anniversary of Earth Day: A teachable moment

[Editor’s Note: This morning, AGU sent the following email to its members. We wanted to make sure everyone received the information, so we posted it here too.] By: Robin Bell, Board President and Brooks Hanson, Executive Vice President, Science The 50th anniversary of Earth Day this year occurs as humanity is working to control a global pandemic. A solution will depend critically on partnership and cooperation among virologists, epidemiologists, health care …

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21 April 2020

Continued carbon dioxide emissions will impair human cognition

Rising CO2 causes more than a climate crisis—it may directly harm our ability to think.

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31 March 2020

Flooding Stunted 2019 Cropland Growing Season, Resulting in More Atmospheric CO2

A new study determines the impact of the severe 2019 floods, and offers scientists a new tool for measuring regional-scale carbon dioxide absorption by plants.

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11 March 2020

Small climate change effects can be the most obvious

Researchers looked at how climate change has already changed temperatures and rainfall patterns worldwide to the point that they would be unfamiliar to people living at the end of the 19th century. Crucially, they then examined how these changes compared with climate fluctuations already experienced in different regions of the globe.

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10 March 2020

Major Greenland glacier collapse 90 years ago linked to climate change

Ninety years ago there were no satellites to detect changes in Greenland’s coastal glaciers, but a new study combining historical photos with evidence from ocean sediments suggests climate change was already at work in the 1930s and led to a major collapse of the one of Greenland’s largest coastal glaciers.

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24 January 2020

The Climate Trail – making a game of the climate apocalypse

I was teaching an introductory-level climate science course last semester, and a conference opportunity came up for me that would require I miss one day of classes. I decided to have students play The Climate Trail and write up a review of the game for an assignment.

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26 December 2019

Forces from Earth’s spin may spark earthquakes and volcanic eruptions at Mount Etna

A new study suggests that polar motion and subsequent shifts in Earth’s crust may increase volcanic activity. “I find it quite exciting to know that while climate drives Earth’s spin, its rotation can also drive volcanoes and seismicity,” said Sébastien Lambert, a geophysicist at Paris Observatory in France and lead author of the study. The new findings, however, don’t allow scientists to forecast volcanic activity.

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12 December 2019

One of Europe’s worst famines likely caused by devastating floods

Europe’s Great Famine of 1315–1317 is considered one of the worst population collapses in the continent’s history. Historical records tell of unrelenting rain accompanied by mass crop failure…Now, new research using tree ring records confirms the historical data, showing the years of the Great Famine were some of Europe’s wettest.

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9 December 2019

AGU Revises Climate and Data Position Statements: Declares World in Climate Crisis and Reaffirms Data as a World Heritage

In a revised climate position statement released today, based on the overwhelming research and scientific evidence, AGU is declaring the world to be in a climate crisis. In a concurrent updated data position statement, AGU describes scientific data as a world heritage and calls for a culture that supports, enables, and nurtures data that is equitable, accessible, and ethical. AGU position statements articulate the views of our community on key …

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5 December 2019

Can Arctic ‘ice management’ combat climate change?

Both sea ice retreat and global warming could be slowed by millions of wind-powered pumps, drifting in the sea ice, to promote ice formation during the Arctic winter. Researchers have now, for the first time, tested the concept using a complex climate model.

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4 December 2019

New study models impact of calving on retreat of Thwaites Glacier

A new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters modeled how much faster Thwaites, one of West Antarctica’s largest and fastest-retreating glaciers, would retreat in the absence of its ice shelf — the part of the glacier that floats on top of the sea, supporting the thicker ice behind…“Worst-case scenario, it is going to be gone in less than a century. But it may also take much longer.”

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