Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Arctic science Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

11 April 2022

Live-trapping lynx in the far north

Knut Kielland, a professor with UAF’s Department of Biology and Wildlife, used to trap lynx for their fur. Here, he has captured this 22-pound female lynx as part of an Alaska-wide project he leads to better understand the ecology of the animal.

Read More >>


1 October 2021

Fluorescent bill may be seabird’s neon sign

The crested auklet looks like a smiling clown that never blinks. It is probably the only seabird that smells like a tangerine. Its beak — the color of a tangerine — is so bright a scientist thinks it may be fluorescent.

Read More >>


23 December 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 21

We’ve handed the torch and now will be eager fans waiting to hear information from the field. I’m feeling this cavity starting to form inside my chest. Already feeling a sense of loss, a sense of melancholy.

Read More >>


22 December 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 20

It’s come to the end, of Leg 1 at least. Strange feeling. The Leg 1 personnel moved over to the Kapitan Dranitsin, while the Leg 2 personnel moved over to Polarstern. I was on Polarstern in the afternoon and felt like an intruder. It is their ship now.

Read More >>


21 December 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker – Part 19

Kapitan Dranitsyn arrived yesterday, to great fanfare from people on both ships….. but apparently our ice floe was not as happy to have another ship around. Cracks emanating from the area of the ships headed out in multiple directions.

Read More >>


20 December 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker – Part 18

Today was pretty windy, and that wind bites hard. Holding this boom up to the tower and then attaching it with a bunch of U-bolts. This requires nimble and dexterous hands, my thin silk glove liners. I could get one or two nuts screwed on and then had to stuff my hand back into my glove to get it a bit warmer.

Read More >>


19 December 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker – Part 17

Every day is packed full of hard work and many activities, but sometimes there are very busy days. Like today. Here is a day in the life out here…

Read More >>


18 December 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker – Part 16

Once again the ice dynamics have become active. High winds from the south have been pushing against our floe, and across the major shear zone that extended across the front of the ship. We’ve seen a little bit of activity there in the last days, but not much. But now things have really come together, jagged pieces of ice getting pushed 3-4 meters up into the air, likely extending 20m or more down below the surface.

Read More >>


17 December 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker – Part 15

There are some interesting sounds out here. The wind howling, you can even hear the snow blowing along the surface with little tinkles. The pops of a new crack forming. Water lapping up against the side of an open lead. But today were some great sounds…

Read More >>


24 December 2018

Modeling sea ice has impact far beyond the poles

With the CICE program, a wide range of researchers study how sea ice grows and melts, crumples and moves, and interacts with global climate patterns

Read More >>


23 November 2018

The best inspiration is hand-on experience

Field scientists, I have decided, are the lucky ones. Unlike a variety of other professions, field scientists have the opportunity to travel to remote places and observe the wonders of the world, to see magnificent environmental beauty and escape boring everyday life, all in the name of science. I had the chance to be one of these lucky field scientists up in the Arctic in August 2018.

Read More >>


30 March 2018

Overflow ice as northern oasis

Overflow ice, also known as aufeis, is like a field of arctic daisies that comes back year after year.

Read More >>


12 January 2018

Image of Porcupine caribou herd travels cross country

There are no photographs of bison spilling by the thousands across the Great Plains. By the time cameras came along, most of the bison were gone. John Wright of Fairbanks believes he has an Alaska version of what that photo might have been.

Read More >>


3 November 2017

When Jerry Brown came to Nome

The California governor was stopping in Nome on his way to a meeting in Russia. The 79-year-old environmentalist and leader of a state that resembles a progressive nation wanted to learn why the far north matters. He had never been to the Arctic or Alaska before.

Read More >>


18 September 2017

Collecting unique data where the Atlantic Water meets the Arctic Ocean: A-TWAIN2017

Life on board RV Lance is very ‘koselig’ (cosy in Norwegian). Meals are served at fixed hours in the mess three times a day and coffee is always brewing.

Read More >>


14 September 2017

Gaining Insight into the Atlin Ophiolite

Atlin was chosen for our field site because it’s home to an ophiolite, a rare place on earth where the crust and mantle are exposed at the surface.

Read More >>


13 September 2017

Journeying to Earth’s Interior on a Mountain in British Columbia

I spent several days last week on the summit of Monarch Mountain in the company of two Texas A&M University geophysicists and one undergraduate.

Read More >>


28 July 2017

Crossing the divide into a new world

On our summer-long hike along the path of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, this morning my dog Cora and I left the last tangle of boreal forest along America’s highway system. We walked away from a campsite of white spruce and balsam poplar that shielded us during a rain and wind storm the day before.

Read More >>


23 June 2017

A restock and recharge along the pipeline’s path

I’ve been in Alaska’s second-largest city for a few days now, resupplying for the trip north as I hike with my dog on the path of the Trans-Alaska pipeline. Three hundred fifty miles down, 450 to go.

Read More >>


20 April 2017

Tundra swans take two distinct paths to Alaska

Both the East and West Coast tundra swans spend the majority of their lives migrating. Based on information from the satellite trackers, the bird I saw might have left the Central Valley of California in late January. From there, it looped across Oregon and Washington, maybe northern Utah, on its way to the prairie in Canada. Then it flew over northern British Columbia and back to Alaska.

Read More >>