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5 March 2020

The Future of Another Timeline, by Annalee Newitz

What if geologists studied more than just Earth processes and history, but also how to go back in time and manipulate that history? That’s the job of the “cultural geologist” who is the flawed protagonist of Annalee Newitz‘s novel The Future of Another Timeline. (I’ve previously read her book Autonomous, and enjoyed it. I see her as a leading thinker about futurism’s intersection with feminism.) In TFOATL, the main character, …

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10 December 2019

‘Streetcar 2 Subduction’ is live!

This week marks the launch of a new digital revision of a field guide to the geology of San Francisco, “Streetcar 2 Subduction.” Learn more here!

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27 September 2019

Friday folds: O’Shaughnessy Boulevard, Glen Canyon Park, San Francisco

The western edge of O’Shaughnessy Boulevard, near Glen Canyon Park in San Francisco shows beautiful examples of crumpled cherts. Here are a few dozen photos of these glorious outcrops, and instructions on how to visit.

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13 September 2019

Friday fold: crinkled schist from Italy

AGU’s Chief Digital Officer Jay Brodsky offers up a fresh European fold for you today — and this one is on rather a smaller scale than Jay’s last Friday fold contribution… Click through for a bigger version. These are lovely crinkly folds in highly foliated rocks. I love boxy little crenulations like these. Jay tells me that this is from Graines, Italy, in one of the valleys of the Val …

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29 March 2019

Friday fold: Plunging Purisima

AGU’s Centennial year is also the 35th anniversary of the publication of Clyde Wahrhaftig’s unique field guide to the geology of San Francisco. A team of geologists is updating “A Streetcar to Subduction” for a modern digital audience, and recently did some California field work to visit key sites. Check out one of them here with the Friday fold, as we visit a plunging syncline in the Purisima Formation on the coast near San Mateo.

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12 December 2018

Dr. G’s #AGU18 Spotlight – Thriving Earth Exchange Story Slam

“AGUs Thriving Earth Exchange is when scientific knowledge and community wisdom come together, where scientists do not stand for people but stand along side them. This is new – this is a movement.”

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7 December 2018

Welcome to D.C. for #AGU2018

A summary of resources to learn about the geology of Washington, D.C. and the surrounding region, in anticipation of AGU’s Fall Meeting being held in the nation’s capital city.

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17 July 2018

Stitching Hope for the Coast – communicating coastal optimism for Louisiana

We’re asking anyone to knit, crochet, quilt… create anything with yarn or fabric that represents hope for the Louisiana coast. We’re creating a group on Ravelry, have a website (http://tinyurl.com/stitchingcoast) and hashtag (#stitchingcoast) ready to go, and now, we just need needleworkers! It doesn’t matter the age or level of ability or where you live.

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9 November 2017

Community advice to young hydrologists, Part 1

What book or paper has been most influential to your career and why?

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8 December 2016

Silent samples, holey samples

Two very different samples tell stories that are full of holes. What’s going on with this weathered sandstone? What’s going on with this fossil scallop shell?

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6 September 2016

35th International Geological Congress: Day #4

Today I’m blogging about Day #4 (Thursday) of the 35th International Geological Congress (IGC), which I attended last week in my home city of Cape Town, South Africa. You can also read my posts about Day #1, Day #2, and Day #3. On Thursday I only spent the morning at IGC since in the afternoon I had some private meetings offsite. I spent most of the morning attending some more talks on …

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28 December 2015

Corona Heights Fault, San Francisco

At the end of the AGU Fall meeting, Callan visits the Corona Heights “mirror” fault, renowned for its gorgeous slickensides. Explore the site in photos in GigaPans.

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27 March 2014

TEDx says get ready… but keep your device off

I’m off to TEDxPhiladelphia tomorrow.  I am ready to be inspired by speakers with solutions to great challenges and innovative ideas.  I have attended and blogged about previous TEDxPhilly and TEDxPhiladelphiaEd events, and I always bring away great stories to share with students.  I have been receiving many emails leading up the event with suggestions that I dress casual, pack light, and then there’s this: Unplug » Sounds crazy to us, too …

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26 March 2014

2014 TLT Symposium at Penn State

Another year, another great Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium (known as the TLT Symposium) held at Penn State!  This is “the” event for faculty, graduate students, and instructional designers from across all campuses of the university to come together to share their best practices and innovative approaches to using technology in the classroom – whether that classroom be face-to-face, blended, or fully online. I blogged about the TLT Symposium …

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20 March 2014

From TED: 3 rules to spark learning

Ramsey Musallam’s TED talk is described as the following: “It took a life-threatening condition to jolt chemistry teacher Ramsey Musallam out of ten years of “pseudo-teaching” to understand the true role of the educator: to cultivate curiosity. In a fun and personal talk, Musallam gives 3 rules to spark imagination and learning, and get students excited about how the world works.” What the description does not share is that he …

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16 March 2014

Taking Google Earth beyond the “dirt”

In 2006, oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle had a conversation with the Google Earth and Maps director that set our Google views on an exciting path forward.  Dr. Earle stated (in her words from a blog post): “You should call Google Earth ‘Google Dirt’. What about the ¾ of the planet that is blue?”  Zip forward to February 2009, when Google launched Ocean in Google Earth which now allows us to …

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15 March 2014

Different tech tools used to find missing Malaysia Airlines jet

It is when events such as the disappearance of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 remind us of large our planet is and the challenges of exploration – or in this case, pinpointing the location for rescue/recovery of this plane and the 239 people on board (as I write this post, the flight has been missing for eight days). There was one report that a crash site had been determined through …

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18 February 2014

My first run with Nearpod

Today was a really special (and exhausting!) day for me.  I spent the day in the classroom of a good friend and colleague, Theresa Lewis-King.  Theresa teaches at AMY Northwest, a middle school in Philadelphia.  Last fall, Theresa wrote a mini-grant and obtained three iPad minis for her classroom.  She knows I use technology with my students, and she was looking for ideas of how to use the iPads in …

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2 February 2014

GoldieBlox is back – thanks to online voting

Last year, I wrote a blog post about GoldieBlox and the use of a Beastie Boys song to promote their toys to help girls develop an early interest in engineering (see Is a parody copyright infringement or fair use?).  The chatter about GoldieBlox company diminished in the news – but then, it has come back in a big way – with its own Super Bowl commercial! Thanks to Intuit and …

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30 January 2014

Pick A Student

Picture this… you are sitting in class, taking notes while the professor is lecturing, and then, she pauses and turns to the class to ask a question.  She is waiting for an answer.  What do you do?  You avoid eye contact so that she doesn’t call on you.  You bury your head in your laptop, or you start texting on your cell phone… Sound familiar? So, how is the faculty …

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