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17 December 2015

Music of the Earth

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

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Volcano pressure guns show how rocks spew and eruptions ensue

The vinegar volcano is a stale science experiment. But Italian geologist Valeria Cigala takes the tired demonstration to a violent new level…

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5 November 2015

The latest on magnetics

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise. Read more posts here.

We are currently mapping our last survey line on Tamu Massif, and we will soon be ready to head out. The planetary Kp index, used to characterize the magnitude of geomagnetic storms, says the magnetic field is a little unsettled.

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3 November 2015

End of days

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise. Read more posts here.

As the end of Magnetic Anomalies expedition draws near, we will soon complete our exploration over Tamu Massif, the World’s Largest Single Volcano.

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29 October 2015

3D images of magma below Mono Craters

A new conceptual model of the magma system below Mono Lake and Mono Craters in eastern California gives scientists a more detailed understanding of volcanic processes at depth and a better model for forecasting volcanic unrest. The accuracy and high resolution of the new three-dimensional images of the magma chambers and volcanic “plumbing” below Mono Basin give scientists a better understanding of their size, shape and where the next eruption might occur.

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22 October 2015

Studying Tamu Massif

We’re pleased to introduce a series of guest blog posts by Schmidt Ocean Institute’s Research team on their research vessel Falkor. Join us as we catch up with them and follow along on their expedition.

The Falkor is currently on a 36-day research trip. Her destination is Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located approximately 1500 kilometers (or 932 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau. During their journey, researchers will focus on collecting bathymetric and magnetic data that could help clarify how Tamu Massif, possibly the world’s largest single volcano, was formed.

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23 April 2015

Amazing Time-Lapse of Calbuco Volcano in Chile

This video speaks for itself: Check out the image at sunset from the NY Times twitter feed. Also Andy Revkin has more info here.

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7 September 2014

Volcanic Shock Wave from Papua New Guinea

Turn up the sound, and watch. Isn’t geology cool!

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5 February 2014

Stunning HD videos show volcanoes erupting … gorgeously

As the Tectonic Plates bend, creak, snap, and rattle in earthquakes, blobs of heated rock rise through them from within and punch through the surface, puffing out vast clouds of rock dust and volatile gas, and pouring out mounds upon mounds of hardening molten rock. Volcanoes may fall under the purview of some other realms of the blogosphere, but a spate of recent videos are just too stunning (and informative!) …

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14 November 2010

Book Review: The Road

I’ve been on a bit of a post-apocalyptic kick this year. It all started when I got Fallout 3 last Christmas, and once I finished that game I moved on to reading some of the classics of the genre like On the Beach and I am Legend and The Stand. There’s something oddly fascinating about seeing characters face the end of the world, and to me it’s even more interesting …

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