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16 March 2020

The value of face-to-face virtual meetings for scicomm (& more)

Workplaces are set up for virtual work. Folks telework more and more. I personally attend a ton of meetings over  the phone. However, I’ll be the first one to admit that if I’m participating in a meeting via phone, my attention is not 100%* on the subject at hand.

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9 March 2020

Storytelling basics: The meat and ornaments of a story

Did you ever have a great idea, start that idea, then life hits you and that idea gets sidelined? That’s what happened w/ this series. But, I’m back, and there’s so much more storytelling to talk about!

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12 February 2020

The Geology Project: Bilingual Geoscience Communication by Bilingual Geoscientists

During the AGU Fall Meeting 2019, I presented a talk on The Geology Project (TGP). TGP is a social media-based geoscience communication enterprise with special focus on providing content in both Spanish and English. Based in Puerto Rico, TGP is run by five young Puerto Rican geoscientists, with one mission: communicating science to the world!

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6 January 2020

Fall Meeting was amazing. What now?

Now that the holiday season is (largely) over, we’re reflecting here at Sharing Science on the successes of Fall Meeting and where we go from here.

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2 December 2019

SciComm, policy, and outreach at AGU19!

♩It’s the most, wonderful tiiiiiiiime, of the year! ♫ 

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10 July 2019

Hey, farmer, farmer, put away the DDT now

Music has often been used as an outlet for activists to reach a broader audience on issues concerning politics, social issues, and environmental crises. Joni Mitchell was a prominent and very influential recording artist in the 1970’s that embodied this idea of using music to educate the public.  One of her most popular songs “Big Yellow Taxi,” called out various environmental issues like deforestation and, what stood out the most to me, the use of DDT.k

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1 April 2019

Embedding science within the art world

Art and science are often seen as complete opposites: art is subjective, while science aims to discover objective facts about nature. But more and more, we are realising that there are commonalities between the two and art-science collaborations have become more common. From the scientists’ perspective, such efforts can potentially reach audiences outside of the scientific echo chamber, however, it’s not always clear whether they always successfully do this in practice.

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11 March 2019

Is Chasing Ice an effective message on climate change?

In 2005 and 2006, photographer James Balog set out on expeditions to document the recession of the Sólheimajökull Glacier in Iceland. In many ways, these expeditions changed his life. In 2007, Balog and companions founded the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), an organization devoted to documenting the effects of climate change on glaciers through time-lapse photography. Over 10 years later, the EIS “…provides scientists with basic and vitally important information on the mechanics of glacial melting and educates the public with firsthand evidence of how rapidly the Earth’s climate is changing.”

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What does climate sound and look like?

We’ve developed a new exhibit, called Sounding Climate, that uses sound and images to represent modeled temperature, precipitation, sea ice and carbon dioxide data. The exhibit, installed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, helps public visitors explore data on an interactive touchscreen to understand anthropogenic climate change and natural variability.

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4 February 2019

Conveying Science through Art: An Alternative Way of Communicating about Earth Observation research

In the Americas, We Use Satellites to Sow Dreams in the Soil is a three-part poem that was presented at the 2018 fall session of American Geophysical Union (AGU). The poem was an alternative – perhaps unconventional – way of presenting about three Earth Observation (EO) initiatives that I and colleagues at NASA’s SERVIR Science Coordination Office and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are involved with.

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