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You are browsing the archive for Drawn to Geoscience.

5 May 2021

DrawnToGeoscience: #CrochetYourPHD

It is always great to remember that science communication is a deep sea of learning, the more you dive in, the more secrets you will learn and the more treasures you will find. Bringing these treasures to the surface does not always require complex tools or extraordinary skills. You will be surprised if I told you that simple methods will work the best. From storytelling to science writing, the terms and the language you use really make a difference.

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3 March 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Inspiration in Geoscience

For me, combining science & art always made natural sense. My foray into deliberately combining them came in junior high & high school when I delved into a 3-year long self-directed investigation into “What makes rocks ring?”.

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14 February 2021

#ScienceValentines – 2021 Edition

However you approach Valentine’s Day, at AGU we like to take the opportunity to celebrate scientific disciplines (and puns). 

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21 January 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Cosmic Bodies and Medical Art

Throughout my life I have been drawn to both science and art. Animals, plants, and rocks interested me greatly as a young kid, and in high school I became intrigued by internal human anatomy, particularly hearts, brains, and skulls (to match the emo and metal music I listened to, of course). All the while, I have been drawing since I could hold a pencil and depicted anything I found remotely interesting. Animals, mermaids, people, mythological creatures, bones and plants can all be found in my stacks of early sketchbooks.

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15 January 2021

Introducing #RhymeYourResearch

Today we are introducing a new series: #RhymeYourResearch. Inspired by our yearly workshop at our annual meeting, and a close working relationship with the folks over at Consilience, an online poetry journal exploring the spaces where the sciences and the arts meet, we want to feature folks who create science poems.

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13 January 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Cross stitching science

I’ve always enjoyed art and exercising my creativity. Although I chose a career in science – studying Biomedical Sciences, followed by a research Master’s and currently my PhD in Microbiology, art is a vital component of my self-care routine. It helps me unwind, but is also highly rewarding with an end product that I’m proud of.

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16 December 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: SciComm with masks

I didn’t think I’d ever use a mask to communicate science, but here I am!  Due to COVID-19, masks became a requirement for in-person activities.  I enjoy science communication and outreach, and I knew I would still be doing in-person activities this semester, so I decided I would give “masked science” a try. 

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2 December 2020

How to Sketch Your Science

“Sketch” implies an unpolished piece of work- something recognizable, good enough to share, but that doesn’t require the hours of patience to make it perfect. There’s a reason that we encourage you to #SketchYourScience- it doesn’t need to be perfect, it needs only be done.

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25 November 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Chemistry in Nature

I have always loved art since I was little, you could find me alone drawing away somewhere or in class doodling. I wanted to be an artist at a young age but vividly recall my mother telling me “No, artists don’t make money.” From that point on I had no idea what I would do with myself, but it wasn’t being an artist. I still continued creating art but struggled in school, especially with math and science. My freshman year of high school I was set on the idea of dropping out and becoming a tattoo artist. I was failing all of my classes and saw no point in continuing with school.

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18 November 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Refraction in Action

Earlier this summer when I was beginning to brainstorm ideas for the science art exhibition I would be co-organizing, my partner and I went to Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park near Grand Rapids, Michigan. While some of the sculptures were large and complex, I was struck by the simplicity of some of the sculptures. Made only of a few metal blocks and rods, these works of art still communicated complex thoughts and ideas. I began to wonder what scientific concept I could communicate in a simple manner.

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