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You are browsing the archive for Drawn to Geoscience Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

3 June 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Go Forth and Science

Art is a thing I was really into when I was younger; I was totally that kid who took art classes outside of school, drew on napkins (and myself), and doodled in the margins of all my notebooks. But then I went to college, got sucked into the wonderful world of science, and let drawing fall off my list of usual activities.

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27 May 2020

#DrawntoGeoscience: Fruitcake at Sea

I was taking a break last winter from packing to go to sea aboard the JOIDES Resolution for Expedition 379 to Antarctica, scrolling through Twitter, when I saw the story of a fruitcake that had been left behind in 1911 by Sir Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova expedition — and was deemed still edible.

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20 May 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Art asks questions, science seeks answers

#DrawnToGeoscience is a series of posts by artists who draw about science and explain their process and inspiration while also showcasing their pieces. Learn more about contributing. This week, Adam Swanson. This post is adapted from a post in a sister blog here.  Science and art are deeply related. Both involve looking hard at what is around us: taking time to observe and collect information to filter through brains. Art asks …

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13 May 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: The Earth Talking

I am fascinated by the overlaps between art and science, which feel particularly salient within geoscience. This project, “dialogue: the earth talking,” grew out of my deep fascination with the intersections of art and geology, and the marks that humans generally, and I specifically, make on land.

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6 May 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Drawn In

Drawing was never my thing. All through high school, I took ceramics (and a couple metals) classes, and in college I added film photography to my suite of hobbies, but for me drawing was mostly just doodling.

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4 May 2020

Introducing #AGURocks & #DrawnToGeoScience

…today we’re introducing the #AGURocks and #DrawnToGeoScience campaigns. We want to hear your songs and see your drawings. And we want to learn about the inspiration and processes behind them. We’re hoping to not only showcase your works but also provide some inspiration for aspiring artists and musicians out there.

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28 December 2018

Drawn to Geoscience: Really, though…what was the OG paleo diet?

By Shane M Hanlon At our annual meeting early this month, researchers presented new findings that brings insight into the diets of Neanderthals. Here a good summary of the work via Eos. AND, we were fortunate enough to have our old friend JoAnna Wendel draw a comic describing the findings! Check it out below. Shane M Hanlon is a Program Manager in AGU’s Sharing Science Program. Follow him @ecologyofshane. JoAnna Wendel is a freelance science …

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17 December 2018

Drawn to Geoscience: Tornadoes form from…wait, the ground up?! Seriously?

At our annual meeting last week, researchers presented new findings showing that contrary to popular views, tornadoes may (might) form from the ground up versus from clouds down. Here a good summary of the work via The Washington Post. AND, we were fortunate enough to have our old friend JoAnna Wendel draw a comic describing the findings!

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15 February 2018

Drawn to Geoscience: Narwhals!!!

Narwhals, narwhals, swimming in the ocean…

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11 December 2017

The Ins and Outs of Drawing Exploding Meteors

By JoAnna Wendel  Asteroids! As with many of my comics, the most challenging aspect was representing movement. In this comic, the movement I had to depict was air moving through a meteor, and then that meteor exploding. I also had to draw a meteor disintegrating, which was especially challenging. For the air movement, I used blue arrows—I figured blue is commonly associated with air, and arrows are a good, simple …

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