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You are browsing the archive for turkey Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Mountain Beltway.

2 February 2011

Capadoccia 4

On our second day in Capadoccia, Lily and I went for a walk through one of the valleys that are eroded into the landscape there. Bas-relief hoodoos emerging from the wall of the canyon: We came to one area with classic turret-like hoodoos: Note the gravel layers in that column’s section, and the human at right for scale. The greater resistance to erosion of the upper (presumably ignimbritic ashflow) layer …

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1 February 2011

Capadoccia 3

Callan shares some more images from last summer’s trip to Capadoccia, Turkey. Eroded turrets of ignimbrite served as dwellings for Byzantine-era Christians, who decorated them with distinctive art.

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29 January 2011

Capadoccia 2b – panorama

Click this image to go to a big panorama (but not big enough to be hosted by Gigapan) of one of the valleys near Göreme, Capadoccia, Turkey: Note: The agriculture that lines the bottom of the valley. The colors of the tuff, and how they vary from place to place. The differentially eroding layer that dips off to the left (best exposed on the right).

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Capadoccia 2a

Any questions?

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27 January 2011

Capadoccia 1

Today, you get the first of several batches of photos dealing with one of the most magical places I’ve ever been, the Capadoccia region of Turkey. Capadoccia (pronounced “kap-uh-doke-ee-yuh“) is an area of eroded volcanic tuffs. The overall effect is badlands-like, but without the micro-turrets and hoodoos. The individual erosional remnants are larger in Capadoccia than in places like Bryce Canyon, Utah. Why this is, I don’t know – it …

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9 December 2010

Gravel and sand

Another image from Turkey… Tell me, fluvial folks and sedimentary soothsayers, what do you see here? Here’s a bigger version, if that helps.

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6 December 2010

Gerede segment of the North Anatolian Fault

The author recounts a field trip in October along the section of Turkey’s North Anatolian Fault that last ruptured in 1944. The rock types on either side of the fault are compared, offset markers are illustrated, and several types of landforms particular to strike-slip faults are shown. The post concludes with an examination of the town of Gerede itself, which is built directly atop the fault.

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29 November 2010

Tavşanlı Zone field trip, part 7

Part 6 of the Tavşanlı Zone field trip had us looking at some blueschists and eclogites. Today we conclude the terrific field trip with a brief look at a couple more stops.

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16 November 2010

Extended tomb

This summer, strolling atop the massive travertine terraces of Pamukkale, Turkey, I checked out the necropolis (graveyard) of Hierapolis, an ancient city founded around 200 BCE and abandoned after an earthquake in 1534. One thing that caught my eye there was this tomb, built of travertine blocks.

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15 November 2010

Joint sets at Pamukkale, Turkey

A lot on my plate today, so I’m just going to toss a random photo from my summer trip to Turkey up on the blog for today. This is a block of building stone at Hierapolis, the Greek spa resort atop the travertine mounds of Pamukkale, in central Turkey (near the town of Denizli). Check out the sweet joints: They occur in two main sets, which intersect at angles between …

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