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24 November 2017

Friday fold: Idaho Springs Fm. amphibolite

Here’s a guest Friday fold from reader Carl Brink: Carl tells me that this is: Precambrian Amphibolite schist float boulder from the Idaho Springs Formation in Rist Canyon west of Fort Collins, Colorado.  Knife is 2.25 inches long. Thanks for sharing, Carl!

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16 September 2016

Friday fold: Centenary migmatite

The Friday fold is a guest submission from Bill Burton, who took the photo of these lovely ptygmatic folds in migmatite in a national park on the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Park Service.

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22 April 2016

Friday fold: Crumpled Dinwoody Formation, Sheep Mountain, Wyoming

Today for your folding pleasure, I give you two field GigaPans shot by Jeffrey Rollins, a two-time Rockies field course alumnus and Old Dominion University student working under my colleague Declan De Paor, assisted by NOVA student Bridget Gomez, during last summer’s extended GigaPan expedition at the Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming. This particular outcrop was found near the axis of the massive Laramide fold, and shows an extensively deformed section …

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18 August 2015

The Revenant, by Michael Punke

On the recommendation of my friend Troy Holland, I just finished reading Michael Punke’s novel about Hugh Glass. The book has been optioned as a film, and because it stars Leonardo diCaprio, it will doubtless be a hit. What got Troy’s attention, though, is the director: Alejandro González Iñárritu, the guy who gave us Babel, Birdman, and Amores Perros, all of which were masterful films. So what’s a ‘revenant?’ Wikipedia’s …

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12 August 2015

Rockies student projects, 2015

Another year, another batch of student projects from my Rockies field course, each intended to elucidate some aspect of the geology of the Montana / Wyoming Rocky Mountains for the general public: Geology of Grand Teton National Park (Marcell) Tilted glaciolacustrine beds near Glacier National Park (James) Blog on various aspects of the field course’s geology (Zack) A geologist’s guide to the Beartooth Highway (Peri) The Sawtooth Range and the …

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Student guest post: the Belt Supergroup in Glacier National Park

As longtime readers know, late summer is when my Rockies students submit their final projects – web-based explanations of key geologic sites they examined during the trip. Today, I offer you a guest blog post by student John Leaming. You’ll notice that I’m not *completely* absent from the post, however – I make a couple of cameos as “sense of scale.” Enjoy, -CB ______________________________________________________________ Glacier National Park, Belt Supergroup I …

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7 August 2015

Friday fold: Yin-Yang at Swift Dam

What is Matt looking at here? Matt was one of my Rockies students this summer, a geology major at the University of Virginia. Together with another UVA student and students from Mary Washington University and George Mason University, Matt embarked on a mountain-climbing hike during our evening camping at Swift Dam, near Depuyer, Montana. The hikers were treated to an extraordinary sight when they attained the summit: Click to embiggen; …

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24 July 2015

Friday folds: Fox’s and Foch’s

A final Friday fold (for now) from Howard Allen: This is : A view south across Kananaskis Lakes, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta, through mist/low-hanging clouds. Snow highlights the Sarrail Creek Syncline and Warspite Anticline on the north faces of mounts Fox (left/east) and Foch (right/west). Rocks are Lower Carboniferous carbonates of the Banff, Livingstone and Mount Head formations. Happy Friday all – and thanks for sharing all these great …

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3 March 2015

Ichnofossils in Gog quartzite

At the Spiral Tunnels overlook on the Trans-Canada Highway, you can look at trains. Or, you can check out some lovely trace fossils in boulders which divide the viewing area from the highway: These are in the Gog Formation, a Cambrian-aged quartz arenite, mostly fused to quartzite nowadays… I know which subject I would choose to spend my time looking at…

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6 February 2015

Friday fold: Ouray Limestone, Colorado

Kim Hannula shares a fold today: Kim says: The rocks folded here mostly the Devonian Ouray Limestone. There’s a fault through the outcrop, and another fault to the left of the photo. Regionally, the faults are mapped as normal faults, mostly with the east (right in photo) side down. Locally, that’s not what I see in this outcrop, which makes this a funky place to look at a fold with …

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