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4 January 2011

Diamictite close-ups

Here’s three shots of the Konnarock Formation diamictite, taken with my Nikon microscope. Field of view is about 1 cm in each shot.

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30 December 2010

A whopper of a mystery rock from the Golden State

When I was out in California in October 2009, about the same time that Garry Hayes passed me on the highway heading up to Yosemite while I was headed down towards the Modesto Airport, I pulled over to check out some rock exposures on the side of the road. This was near the Don Pedro Reservoir (right about here). While standing there, my attention was caught by a strange looking …

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9 December 2010

Animated laminae

More of the new scientific medium* I showed you on Wednesday: animated GIFs of super-small stuff, to give a sense of depth. This time, I included a 1 mm scale bar: These are laminations of silt and clay in the rhythmites of the lower Konnarock Formation. If the above image moves too fast for your eye to keep up with, here’s another version of it, which is set to a …

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8 December 2010

Focusing on S-C fabrics

An animated image showing changing focus on a microscope camera aimed at a sample of S-C fabric is shared. Readers are encouraged to brainstorm uses for animated GIF images in the geosciences.

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28 September 2010

Speleothem microscopy: soot & aragonite

My friend Dave Auldridge, formerly a structural geology student of mine at George Mason University, is now in grad school at the University of Alabama. Dave is working on an interesting project with speleothems: those drippy looking CaCO3 growths that you find in caves, like stalactites and stalagmites. He’s looking at these speleothems in order to determine paleo-climate with oxygen and carbon isotopes. The carbon soot that’s trapped in the …

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