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You are browsing the archive for mass wasting Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Mountain Beltway.

20 March 2014

Montoya Group fossils and faults on the Crazy Cat landslide

Today, I initiate a series of posts based on some of the geology I saw over spring break, in west Texas and southern New Mexico, on the field exchange between Northern Virginia Community College and El Paso Community College that I helped facilitate. We spent our first morning in the field in the Franklin Mountains, due north of El Paso (and, for that matter, Ciudad Juarez). It was unseasonably cold …

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6 December 2013

Friday fold: Turtle Mountain and the Frank Slide

The Friday fold can be found this week at Turtle Mountain, Alberta, where it triggered a massive landslide.

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4 April 2013

Slump / earthflow at JMU campus, Harrisonburg

Yesterday I drove down I-81, through the heart of Harrisonburg, Virginia, and the campus of James Madison University. On the east side of the road, a big new slump / earthflow caught my eye. On my way back up the same stretch of road today, I pulled over and photographed it: Panorama 1 (click to enlarge: ~6000 pixels wide): Panorama 2 (click to enlarge: 10,000 pixels wide): It’s this slope …

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5 March 2013

Documenting doomed outcrops: Scientists’ Cliffs, Maryland

The community of Scientists’ Cliffs in Maryland is a private community that happens to sit on some of the most amazing fossil exposures in the Coastal Plain. The strata in question are part of the Miocene-aged (~14 Ma) Calvert Formation. The Scientists’ Cliffs outcrops are better than the more famous outcrops at Calvert Cliffs State Park, mainly because of easier access. At the park, you have to hike in a …

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30 January 2013

Sand avalanche animated GIF

Some of the dynamics of small-scale mass wasting in granular materials are captured in this animated GIF from sand dunes in Death Valley.

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26 August 2012

Paw Paw Tunnel GigaPans

A weekend expedition to GigaPan the C&O Canal’s singular Paw Paw Tunnel results in an exposition on Devonian sedimentation, Alleghanian mountain-building, structural geology, and the incision of the Potomac River to produce entrenched meanders.

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17 August 2012

Guest post: Turtle Mountain and the infamous Frank Slide

A guest post by Nicholas Rossi, a student in Callan’s Canadian Rockies field course. Turtle Mountain is located in the Blairmore Range in Alberta Canada about 160km south of Calgary. It is the site of the Frank Slide, a landslide of over 90 million tons of rock that gave way on Turtle Mountain’s East side and covered part of the small coal mining town of Frank in about 100 seconds!  …

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22 July 2012

Close one!

Callan and his students narrowly miss being stranded in Banff National Park when a rainstorm triggers a mudslide that closes the TransCanada highway.

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6 July 2012

Friday fold: scenes from the trail to Bertha Lake

Given that I’m leaving tomorrow for the Canadian Rockies, I’ve been inspired to look through some of my photos from last summer, and to realize how few of them I’ve blogged so far. So let me show you some folded things today that Lily and I saw the afternoon we arrived at Waterton Lakes National Park in southernmost Alberta: Here’s a fold on the side of a mountain on the …

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22 November 2011

Asbest-ice

On our way up Compton Peak the other day, my field crew spotted some fibrous growths of ice growing up and out of the ground (perpendicular to the surface of the mountain): (Joe’s hand lens for scale.) The fibrous habit made me think of asbestos, and then I wondered whether the different shapes of ice crystals reflect different mineralogical arrangements of the H and O atoms, and if they are …

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