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13 May 2017

Slump palimpsest, Corridor H

There’s a section of my favorite road, the lovely nowhere-to-nowhere Corridor H, that seems to be having some issues with slumping. I noted this in November of 2015, and I return to the topic today. Here’s a look at the slope, with old drainage “French drains” installed, and a fresh scarp transecting it just the same: I see at least three small scarps there. A short distance further to the …

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10 September 2016

Peat slide!

Not only does it turn out that peat grows on hill tops, not just valley bottoms, but it can slough off and create “peat slides” too!

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21 April 2016

Firsthand reports from Canoa, Ecuador after the quake

Callan’s mother-in-law lives in one of the most strongly-shaken regions of Ecuador. Here, she and her boyfriend recount the experience of the earthquake Saturday night and its aftermath. Includes 8 photos from the scene.

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6 January 2016

Slumped boulder on Marshall’s Beach, San Francisco

The week before the AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco experienced heavy rain and strong coastal wave action. These two phenomena liberated a big boulder of serpentinite on Marshall’s Beach. As it moved downhill, it opened up a scarp with views into the colluvial soil horizons.

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30 November 2015

Slump in progress on Corridor H

I was out on Corridor H last week, looking at rocks with my Honors student, and on the way back from the field work, I noticed this: Click to enlarge That’s a fresh slump scarp running across a slope that is gradually sliding downhill. (The left half of the image is moving down relative to the right.) To judge from the rip-rap-filled culverts, this slope must have a previously-documented history …

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24 December 2014

A rock slide and a protalus rampart (?) on the trail to Helen Lake

A hike to Helen Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta, brings your intrepid geoblogger face to face with a fresh landslide and a curious landform parallel to the glacial valley. Is it a pro-talus rampart?

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3 July 2014

Bell Canyon’s Permian submarine landslide

What are these Border to Beltway students up to?… Clearly, they are all immersed in their field notebooks, sketching away. This was in March, in west Texas. There must be something worth drawing at this road cut… A clue can be seen on the wall of rock behind them. There, you can find features such as this: And this: And this: Those are outsized clasts of gray limestone in fine-grained …

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1 May 2014

Blogging → science

I thought this was pretty cool. Remember the blog post a year ago wherein I documented a slump on a hillside on the campus of James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, adjacent to Interstate 81? Well, a student at JMU, Dan Rowson, ended up doing his research on that slump, and it turned out that the high-resolution panorama I posted was the best available image of the phenomenon. Dan emailed …

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20 March 2014

Montoya Group fossils and faults on the Crazy Cat landslide

Today, I initiate a series of posts based on some of the geology I saw over spring break, in west Texas and southern New Mexico, on the field exchange between Northern Virginia Community College and El Paso Community College that I helped facilitate. We spent our first morning in the field in the Franklin Mountains, due north of El Paso (and, for that matter, Ciudad Juarez). It was unseasonably cold …

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6 December 2013

Friday fold: Turtle Mountain and the Frank Slide

The Friday fold can be found this week at Turtle Mountain, Alberta, where it triggered a massive landslide.

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