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19 November 2015

A little geologic history before breakfast

What geological stories can be read from the stone on the front of a building? Walking past some facing stone in Baltimore, Callan discovers a wealth of little clues.

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12 October 2015

Bedding/cleavage GigaPans at Harpers Ferry, WV

I’ve been thinking lately about Harpers Ferry, the spot where West Virginia, Virginia, and Maryland meet, at the confluence of the Potomac River and the Shenandoah River. I’ve noted small outcrops of its overturned beddding here previously, and also described a book I read about the man who made the place infamous: John Brown. I went out there again last week with my NOVA colleague Beth Doyle, and we explored …

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9 October 2015

Friday fold: Apennine crenulation cleavage

My new social media buddy Samuele Jæger Papeschi and I collaborated on some goofy maps in August, but then he noticed my Friday folds, and like the very best human beings anywhere, Samuele offered to pitch in with a few folds of his own. (Other readers are encouraged to do the same!) Today, I’ll feature the first of them – though others will follow in weeks to come. That is crenulation cleavage …

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24 March 2015

Martinsburg Formation outcrops in Edinburg Gap

A report from the field: new outcrops of Ordovician-aged turbidites featuring geopetal indicators, fossil content, and a structural overprint imparted during Pangaea’s assembly.

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20 March 2015

Friday fold: flexed turbidites

Spring is almost here! As you get ready for the equinox, enjoy this gentle fold on a Friday: These are turbidites (graywacke and shale) of the late Ordovician Martinsburg Formation, seen in Edinburg Gap, western Massanutten Range, greater Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. Bedding is flexed very slightly here, from moderately-dipping to more steep, and then back to moderate again. Slickensides on the top of some exposed layers indicate the beds shifted …

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26 December 2014

Friday fold: another gem from the Chancellor Slate

That pretty much speaks for itself, I reckon.

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21 December 2014

Self destruction of a shale boulder

“Kablooey!”

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12 December 2014

Friday fold: Miette slate, Alberta

The Friday fold returns to Canada, looking at Neoproterozoic slate and quartzite at the southern terminus of the Icefields Parkway. Bonus features include ripple marks, graded beds, cross-bedding, cleavage, and boudinage.

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26 October 2014

Bedding / cleavage relations in the Stephen Formation, Yoho NP

Good afternoon! Here are a few photos, both plain and annotated, showing the relationship between primary sedimentary bedding and tectonic cleavage in the “tectonised Stephen” Formation atop the Cathedral Escarpment (in Yoho National Park), just northeast of the Walcott Quarry where the (thicker, basinward) Stephen Formation hosts the Burgess Shale. Weathering exploits both these planes of weakness… Here, the cleavage is more planar at the bottom of the sample, and …

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24 October 2014

Friday fold: Three more from the Chancellor Slate

Remember our examination of buckle folding versus passive folding in the Chancellor Slate (cleaved limy mudrock) of eastern British Columbia? Well, here’s another example: There’s so much awesomeness going on in that image, it’s hard to know where to start. The prominent black thin layers are buckled in a very boxy, asymmetric way. In places, the layer is discontinuous, suggesting faulting or shortening via pressure solution. Note how the cleavage …

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