Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for 2013 November.

14 November 2013

The Road to Samarcand, by Patrick O’Brian

The week before last, I finished a fun adventure novel, The Road to Samarcand. This is the first book I’ve read by Patrick O’Brian that’s not part of his epic (21 books!) Aubrey-Maturin series. I chose it because it was available as a (free) download from my public library, which meant I could “read” it while driving in the car back and forth from the Fort Valley to Annandale. I’m …

Read More >>

4 Comments/Trackbacks >>


13 November 2013

A congress of salamanders

No, that blog post title is not a dig at the goons on Capitol Hill. It’s apparently the proper term for a group of salamanders. We’ve been seeing a lot of them lately ’round these parts. Take a look… Red-backed salamander: Unidentified black salamander: Red eft: Another one of the unidentified black salamanders, with little white spots all over… …and missing the distal-most portion of his tail! Lovely creatures. We …

Read More >>

1 Comment/Trackback >>


12 November 2013

Canadian Rockies field course 2014

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


11 November 2013

Monday macrobug: milkweed bugs on milkweed pods

Monarch butterflies aren’t the only insects that like visiting milkweed…

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


9 November 2013

Fishers are back in Virginia!

I got word yesterday that the fisher, a medium-sized mustelid (Like a marten, an animal that I’ve seen once up in the Adirondacks of New York), has begun re-colonizing wild parts of Virginia. This is pretty exciting news – a friend from high school shared the image below with me: That’s from a wildlife camera on my friend’s family’s land in northwestern Shenandoah County, in the Cedar Creek Valley. That’s …

Read More >>

90 Comments/Trackbacks >>


8 November 2013

Friday fold: mystery calc-silicate from the USGS

The Friday fold is a cast-off specimen from the USGS. A lovely little orphan, its marble and micaceous layers have polished up nicely. Two sides of the sample are presented here.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


7 November 2013

How to apply for grad school in geology

I had a conversation the other day with a former undergraduate student (now two years past the acquisition of a B.S.) who was considering graduate school. I shared some advice with the student, emboldened by the fact that previous students I’ve shared it with said it was very useful and helped clarify their thinking. And as I was relating it again (for the fifth time in as many years), it …

Read More >>

12 Comments/Trackbacks >>


6 November 2013

Natural Bridge, Yoho National Park: Bedding/cleavage relationships

Check out the scene at Natural Bridge in Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada: Don’t confuse this “Natural Bridge” with the one in Virginia. Here, in the western Canadian Rockies, the structural geology is much better. You may recall that I’ve previously featured outcrops from nearby this site as a Friday fold. It’s a great place for examining bedding / cleavage relationships in the rocks. Here’s the previous picture, annotated: …

Read More >>

2 Comments/Trackbacks >>


5 November 2013

Coal: A Human History, by Barbara Freese

Last week on the flight to and from Denver, I consumed (via audio book, freely downloaded from my public library system) the 2004 microhistory Coal: A Human History, by Barbara Freese. It’s light on the geology, and heavy on the historical implications of coal. As with many of these sorts of books, it’s basically a compilation of related nonfictional explications of topics of diverse scope, all of which have a …

Read More >>

4 Comments/Trackbacks >>


4 November 2013

Monday macrobug: backstroking grub

The Monday macrobug is a juvenile beetle with an odd means of locomotion.

Read More >>

1 Comment/Trackback >>