Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Weather Archives - Page 3 of 7 - GeoSpace.

9 May 2017

Paris 1.5°C target may be smashed by 2026

Global temperatures could break through the 1.5°C barrier negotiated at the Paris conference as early as 2026 if a slow-moving, natural climate driver known as the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has, as suspected, moved into a positive phase.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


4 May 2017

Hawaiian mountains could lose snow cover by 2100

A new study, accepted for publication in Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, indicate that Hawaii’s two volcano summits are typically snow-covered at least 20 days each winter, on average, but that the snow cover will nearly disappear by the end of the century.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


13 March 2017

A perfect storm of fire and ice may have led to snowball Earth

Harvard University researchers have a new hypothesis about what caused the runaway glaciation that covered the Earth pole-to-pole in ice.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


1 March 2017

WMO verifies highest temperatures for Antarctic Region

A World Meteorological Organization (WMO) committee of experts has announced new records for the highest temperatures recorded in the Antarctic Region as part of continuing efforts to expand a database of extreme weather and climate conditions throughout the world.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


10 February 2017

Daily disturbance from upper atmosphere leaves its footprints on tropical rainfall

A team of scientists led by postdoctoral researcher Takatoshi Sakazaki, from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s International Pacific Research Center (IPRC), has analyzed satellite-based observations and computer model simulations of tropical rainfall variation throughout the day in an effort to determine the root cause of the temporal patterns. Their results, accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, show that daily tropical rainfall distribution is significantly shaped by heating of the upper atmosphere.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


8 February 2017

Greenland Ice Sheet melting can cool subtropics and alter climate

A new study finds evidence that the last time Earth was as warm as it is today, cold freshwater from a melting Greenland Ice Sheet circulated in the Atlantic Ocean as far south as Bermuda, elevating sea levels and altering the ocean’s climate and ecosystems.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


6 February 2017

Greener cities could help urban plants endure summer heat

Urban plants offer city dwellers many benefits, such as improved health and decreased crime and pollution. And now we have even more reason to green our cities. A new study from the Water Sustainability and Climate project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison indicates that adding more greenery to the urban landscape could help urban vegetation cope better with the summer heat and a warming climate. In other words, the more plants in a city, the merrier they all are.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


27 January 2017

Global flood risk could increase five-fold with a 4-degree C temperature rise

A new report looks at flood risk and economic damages under different global warming scenarios with temperature increases of 1.5 degrees Celsius, 2 degrees Celsius and 4 degrees Celsius. It concludes that, if global temperatures rise by 4 degrees Celsius, the flood risk in countries representing more than 70 percent percent of the global population and global GDP will increase by more than 500 percent.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


25 January 2017

Weather patterns, trans-Pacific pollution cause spring ozone spikes in SW US

Late spring and early summer is when the air quality is generally good across most of the United States. But newly published research details how a common springtime weather pattern and pollution transported from Asia often conspire to create unhealthy ozone levels for the desert southwest. The new study adds to a growing body of work that explores how ozone can occasionally push some areas of the desert southwest above federal air quality standards.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


4 January 2017

Snowflake variability has significant impact on remote sensing of snowfall rates

Every snowflake is unique—and that could have a big effect on determining how much snow will fall, according to new research.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>