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You are browsing the archive for Russia Glacier retreat Archives - From a Glacier's Perspective.

January 30, 2018

Franz Josef Islands Separate due to Glacier Retreat

Hall Island (left) and Littrow Island (right) in 2002 and 2017 Landsat images.  The islands are connected by glacier in 2002 between the black arrows.  The blue arrows indicate glacier flow.  In 2017 the glacier connection has failed and Nordenskjold Strait has formed.  Hall and Littrow Island are two islands in the southern part of Franz Josef Land, Russia that have until 2016 been connected by glacier. Sharov et al …

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June 27, 2017

Mensu Glacier, Siberia Russia Retreat 1994-2016

Mensu Glacier, Russia in comparison of 1994 and 2016 Landsat images.  Red arrow is the 1994 terminus, yellow arrow 2016 terminus, purple arrow a tributary and purple dots the snowline.  Mensu Glacier (Lednik Mensu) drains northeast from Gora Belukha in the Russian Altai.  The glacier drains into the Ob River and then the Arctic Ocean.  This glacier has not been the focus of detailed research to date. Khromova et al (2014) report …

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August 29, 2016

Lednikovoye Glaciers, Novaya Zemlya 1999-2016 retreat

Comparison of glaciers terminating in Lednikovoye Lake in central Svalbard in 2000 and 2016. Red arrow is the 2000 terminus location and yellow arrows the 2016 terminus location. Lednikovoye Lake in central Novaya Zemlya has four glaciers terminating in it. Here we examine the two unnamed glaciers that discharge into the northwest portion of the lake. The glaciers are retreating like all tidewater glaciers in northern Novaya Zemlya, though they are not …

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August 25, 2016

Kronotsky Peninsula, Kamchatka Glacier Fragmentation/Retreat

The Kronotsky Peninsula is on the east coast of Kamchatka and has an small concentration of alpine glaciers.  A recent paper by Lynch et al (2016) indicates a significant recession during the start of the 21st century in Kamchatka.  They note a 24% loss in area, leading to fragmentation and an increase in the number of ice masses that could be considered glaciers.  Lynch et al (2016)  further note that the …

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