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You are browsing the archive for British Columbia Glacier retreat Archives - From a Glacier's Perspective.

May 13, 2020

Frank Mackie Glacier, BC Retreat Forming Lake

Frank Mackie Glacier, British Columbia in Landsat images from 1987 and 2019.  Red arrow is the 1987 terminus location, yellow arrow the 2019 terminus location and purple dots the snowline. Point 1-3 are specific locations where bedrock exposure has expanded. Frank Mackie Glacier is at the headwaters of the Bowser River which flows into Bowser Lake and the Nass River in NW British Columbia. The glacier has repeatedly advanced across …

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December 16, 2019

Stave River, BC Run of River Hydropower Changes with Glacier Retreat

Stave Glacier area in 1992 and 2019 Landsat images illustrating the loss of glacier area.  Red arrows indicate 1992 terminus location, yellow arrow 2019 terminus location, Point 1-3 are proglacial lake that are evolving, P=Piluk Glacier and S=Stave Glacier. Stave River drains into Stave Lake and has a 40 km length above the lake.  The basin has a glaciated area of 32 km2. The basin above Stave Lake has two …

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October 22, 2019

Falcon Glacier, British Columbia Wings Clipped by Climate Change

Falcon Glacier in 1985 and 2019 Landsat images indicating the 2000 m retreat.  Red arrow is 1985 terminus location, yellow arrow the 2019 terminus location. I=icefall locations joining the glacier. Falcon Glacier in southwest British Columbia drains east from the Compton Neve into the Bishop River, which then joins the Southgate River. The Southgate River is one of three major watersheds emptying into the head of Bute Inlet. The Southgate …

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April 1, 2019

Nakonake Glaciers, BC Retreat Two are Disappearing

Nakonake Glaciers in 1984 and 2018 Landsat images. Nakonake Glaciers are NW=Northwest, N=North, M=Middle, S=South, SE=Southeast.  Red arrows indicate the 1984 terminus position of the North and Middle Nakonake Glaciers.  Yellow arrows indicate the 2018 terminus location of each. Purple dots indicate the snowline and the pink arrow indicates locations of glacier separation. The Nakonake Glaciers are a group of unnamed glaciers at the headwaters of the Nakonake River in …

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October 18, 2018

Talchako Glacier, British Columbia Retreat 1987-2018

Talchako Glacier change revealed in 1987 and 2018 Landsat images.  Red arrow is 1987 terminus location, yellow arrow 2018 terminus, orange arrow a tributary from the north and purple dots the snowline.  Talchako Glacier is the largest outlet glacier of the Monarch Icefield in the Coast Range of British Columbia and is the headwaters of the Talchako River. VanLooy and Forster (2008) noted that the glacier retreated at a rate of …

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June 5, 2018

Warm Creek Glaciers, British Columbia Retreat Driven Separation

Warm Creek, (W) Norht Warm Creek (NW) and Bighorn (H) Glaciers in Northwest British Columbia in 1984 and 2017.  Red arrows are the 1984 terminus location, yellow arrows the 2017 terminus locations and purple arrows where glaciers have separated.  In Northwestern British Columbia a group of unnamed glaciers drain into Tagish Lake via Warm Creek and Bighorn Creek.  Here we examine the profound changes in three glaciers from 1984 to …

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May 4, 2018

Tulsequah Glacier, British Columbia 2900 m retreat 1984-2017

Tulsequah Glacier in 1984 and 2017 Landsat images.  The 1984 terminus location is noted with red arrows for the main and northern distributary tongue, southern distributary red arrow indicates lake margin.  The yellow arrows indicate the 2017 glacier terminus locations. The retreat of 2900 m since 1984 led to a lake of the same size forming. Purple dots indicate the snowline. Tulsequah Glacier, British Columbia is a remote glacier draining …

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October 6, 2017

Klinaklini Glacier, British Columbia Retreat Generates Large Icebergs

Klinaklini Glacier comparison in Landsat images from 1987 and 2017.  Red arrow 1987 terminus, yellow arrow 2017 terminus and snowline at purple dots. Klinaklini Glacier is the largest glacier in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia between Vancouver and Prince Rupert.  The glaier drains west and south from Mt. Silverthrone.  There is significant accumulation area above 2500 m and the glacier terminates at 300 m.  GLIMS noted the area in …

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