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You are browsing the archive for weather Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

30 March 2021

The resilience of rail infrastructure: reports from the Network Rail earthworks and weather advisory task forces

The resilience of rail infrastructure: reports from the Network Rail earthworks and weather advisory task forces

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15 March 2021

Snow is the state of Alaska

Sturm is a snow scientist at University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute who has studied Alaska’s most common ground cover for decades. Many of his explorations are on long snowmachine traverses, undertaken about this time of year in the treeless Arctic.

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16 December 2020

Highlights from Tuesday 15 Dec. at #AGU20

If you missed some sessions from Tuesday, 15 December, don’t worry – you can check them out, along with all other sessions, on demand until 15 February.

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12 December 2020

Weekend viewing from #AGU20

We wrapped up the second week of #AGU20 on Friday! Be sure to check out these sessions and events on-demand – you can even catch up on the couch this weekend.

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18 May 2020

How climate killed corals

New study shows multiple factors joined forces to devastate the Great Barrier Reef in 2016.

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11 March 2020

Small climate change effects can be the most obvious

Researchers looked at how climate change has already changed temperatures and rainfall patterns worldwide to the point that they would be unfamiliar to people living at the end of the 19th century. Crucially, they then examined how these changes compared with climate fluctuations already experienced in different regions of the globe.

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31 January 2020

Small electrical charges could help airplanes avoid lightning strikes

There may be a way to make airplanes less prone to lightning strikes. The trick, surprisingly, might be to give airplanes a bit of an electrical charge when they are in the air, say scientists reporting their experimental work in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

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12 December 2019

One of Europe’s worst famines likely caused by devastating floods

Europe’s Great Famine of 1315–1317 is considered one of the worst population collapses in the continent’s history. Historical records tell of unrelenting rain accompanied by mass crop failure…Now, new research using tree ring records confirms the historical data, showing the years of the Great Famine were some of Europe’s wettest.

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10 December 2019

Property values plummeted and stayed down after Hurricane Ike

Texas homes that took the biggest hit in value after 2008’s Hurricane Ike were, surprisingly, not those within historic flood zones, new research finds. Instead, they were homes just outside these zones, where damage affected whole neighborhoods, driving property value down for years, according to a team of researchers from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill who presented the findings this week at AGU’s Fall Meeting 2019 in San Francisco.

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25 November 2019

Weather in Malaysia provides early forecasts for UK, study finds

“It was once said that the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil could set off a tornado in Texas, and our study provides new evidence of the remarkable interconnectedness of the world’s weather” – Robert Lee, University of Reading

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14 November 2019

Size of thunderstorm dome clouds may predict tornado intensity

The size of a bulge at the top of a thunderstorm’s anvil-shaped cloud may allow researchers to forecast the strength of tornadoes that spawn from such storms, according to a new study in AGU’s journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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11 November 2019

Advancing spring warmth could disrupt species migration, development

In a new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists found that in many areas of the U.S. springtime temperature thresholds important for plant and animal life cycles occur between six to 20 days earlier in the season than they did 70 years ago.

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5 November 2019

Satellite tracking shows how ships affect clouds and climate

By matching the movement of ships to the changes in clouds caused by their emissions, researchers have shown how strongly the two are connected.

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18 September 2019

Study Tallies Huge Hidden Health Costs from Climate Change

Research sheds light on public health impact from climate-related events, spotlight on CO, FL, MI, NV, NJ, NY, NC, OH, TX, WA, and WI.

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17 September 2019

Scientists identify weather event behind extreme cold in Europe and Asia during February 2018

In the new study, researchers tested their hypothesis that a chain of events in the troposphere caused the sudden stratospheric warming and subsequent splitting of the polar vortex.

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10 September 2019

Lightning ‘superbolts’ form over oceans from November to February

The lightning season in the Southeastern U.S. is almost finished for this year, but the peak season for the most powerful strokes of lightning won’t begin until November, according to a newly published global survey of these rare events.

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27 August 2019

Scientists forecasted late May tornado outbreak nearly four weeks before it ripped through U.S.

“This is the first documented successful long-range forecast for an extended period of tornado activity in the U.S.,” said lead author Victor Gensini, a professor of meteorology at Northern Illinois University.

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26 August 2019

Climate change is altering winter precipitation across the Northern Hemisphere

A team of scientists has successfully teased out the influence of human-caused climate change on wintertime precipitation over much of the last century, showing that the warming climate is significantly altering wintertime rainfall and snowfall across the Northern Hemisphere.

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7 August 2019

More intense non-tropical storms causing increased rainfall in Southeast U.S.

A new study in AGU’s journal Geophysical Research Letters examined the region’s precipitation records from 1895 to 2018. The new research found precipitation in the Southeast during the fall increased by almost 40 percent in the past century due to an increase in average daily rainfall rather than the overall number of storms.

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6 August 2019

How the Pacific Ocean influences long-term drought in the Southwestern U.S.

New research explores what conditions in the ocean and in the atmosphere prolong droughts in the Southwestern U.S. The answer is complex, according to a study published Aug. 6 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

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