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9 November 2015

Tamu Massif: Closing thoughts from Chief Scientist Dr. William Sager

This is the last post in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise.

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5 November 2015

The latest on magnetics

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise. Read more posts here.

We are currently mapping our last survey line on Tamu Massif, and we will soon be ready to head out. The planetary Kp index, used to characterize the magnitude of geomagnetic storms, says the magnetic field is a little unsettled.

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3 November 2015

End of days

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise. Read more posts here.

As the end of Magnetic Anomalies expedition draws near, we will soon complete our exploration over Tamu Massif, the World’s Largest Single Volcano.

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2 November 2015

Mapping Tamu Massif one swath at a time

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise. Read more posts here.

As of the 29th of October 2015, the R/V Falkor has traveled 7544.9 km (4688.2 miles) and covered a total of 59,814.51 sq km (23094.5 sq miles) of the ocean seafloor. Our EM-302 multi-beam echo sounder has pinged 166,268 times collecting 71,827,776 soundings over a swath with an average width of 6781.29 m (4.21 miles). The deepest depth encountered so far is 7786.87 m (4.84 miles), and the average depth we are mapping is around 4448.74 m (2.76 miles). We have successfully completed Lines 1-8 and 14-17 and just began to survey Line 13. Even after almost a month of seeing the data streaming in, it is still exciting to see the features of Tamu Massif as the bathymetric/depth data is processed.

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22 October 2015

Studying Tamu Massif

We’re pleased to introduce a series of guest blog posts by Schmidt Ocean Institute’s Research team on their research vessel Falkor. Join us as we catch up with them and follow along on their expedition.

The Falkor is currently on a 36-day research trip. Her destination is Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located approximately 1500 kilometers (or 932 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau. During their journey, researchers will focus on collecting bathymetric and magnetic data that could help clarify how Tamu Massif, possibly the world’s largest single volcano, was formed.

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