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You are browsing the archive for ROV Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

16 November 2019

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker – Part 9

The ice has been trucking along quickly to the north, and with the recent drift we have finally moved north of our original installation position and are now on our way towards the North Pole.

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13 August 2019

Science aboard the R/V Falkor: July 30-August 8

A week and then some of blog posts from people at work doing science at sea…

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24 July 2019

The latest adventures from the R/V Falkor

Seven of the latest posts from the ongoing research cruises.

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8 July 2019

More WaterWords and videos from the Hunting Bubbles expedition

Five new posts from the Hunting Bubbles expedition.

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1 July 2019

Cruise blog: Update on observing seafloor methane seeps at the edge of hydrate stability

Six new posts, including two videos, from the R/V Falkor on its cruise to seek out and study methane bubbles seeping out of the seafloor.

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25 June 2019

Cruise blog: More observing seafloor methane seeps at the edge of hydrate stability

Six new blog posts from the continuing Hunting Bubbles research cruise.

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18 June 2019

Cruise blog: Observing seafloor methane seeps at the edge of hydrate stability

Four new updates from the ongoing cruise of the R/V Falkor…

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13 June 2019

Seeking the Seeps

The unusually bright Oregon sun beams down on me as I watch the soaring Astoria bridge recede into the background. The R/V Falkor has just pushed back from the dock and we’re steaming into the great Columbia River. Looking ahead, I can see twin points of land, framing the mouth of the Columbia like a giant crab claw.

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12 June 2019

Seeking Space Rocks: The search continues

The seaborne portion of our expedition has ended, but the land-based search begins. In the laboratory, all the samples are examined with fresh eyes, using instruments that enable Dr. Marc Fries to “see” potential meteorites at a much finer scale.

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11 June 2019

Translating the wonder of the sea

I am quite sure the very first explorers were crazy. Looking out to the horizon and seeing nothing but water, why on earth would anyone ever traverse those endless waves, into the unknown? Of course, it is the same reason that compels us to tackle new problems and learn new things every day: an interest in the world around us; curiosity.

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10 June 2019

According to plan

After picking up the science team in Astoria, we headed back out to sea! This time we headed northward to the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of Washington State. The aim of this leg is to try to locate and recover fragments of a meteor strike recorded off the coast.

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9 June 2019

Improving the odds

Overnight, the ‘star sieve’ returned several hundred grams of rocky material with characteristics similar to what we are looking for in meteorites – black-colored rocks with a smooth exterior surface. But when ALL of the samples from multiple sites look that way, you have either hit the jackpot or something else is going on.

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6 June 2019

Mucknificence

Seafloor mud is a mucknificent thing. The soft surface of well-sorted, very fine silt and mud provides a wonderful foundation for benthic organisms, but also allows all the larger, coarser, and heavier rocks – including the meteorites we seek – to bury themselves within.

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5 June 2019

The Hunt for the Quinault meteorite begins

The sea is pitching 8 foot swells at the R/V Falkor as the “Seeking Space Rocks” team transits to the first dive site in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. We have three days to look for meteorites on the seafloor, the second time this has ever been attempted.

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4 April 2019

New deep-ocean videos and an artist-at-sea report

An abstract radiolarian sculpture visits the sea, and two video updates from scientists on the R/V Falkor.

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29 March 2019

4k ROV highlights — research cruise video update

“It is one of the most magnificent things I have ever seen in the natural world.”

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19 March 2019

Research cruise log update: Guaymas Basin

Two videos and an oil painting from the current cruise of the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor: Microbial mysteries — linking microbial communities and environmental drivers  

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13 March 2019

Research cruise log: Guaymas Basin

Three new posts from the ongoing research cruise in the Guaymas Basin investigating links between microbial communities and environmental drivers.

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8 March 2019

Mapping the early formation of the oceans

When I was a girl, we traveled to Puebla to visit my grandparents in a town near the Popocatépetl volcano. The fumaroles (smoke) scared me, so I studied the characteristics of the hills around me to find a safe place in case it blew up.

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Big Pagoda Pools — Microbial Mysteries video update

This spectacular underwater volcano was just explored for the first time by scientists aboard the R/V Falkor. 2000 meters below the surface of the ocean, the “Big Pagoda” hydrothermal vent is massive: 30m tall and 23m wide.

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