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You are browsing the archive for research expedition Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

19 November 2017

What is so interesting about submarine volcanoes?

Jagged piles of molten rock, sulfurous smoke, exploding gaseous emissions, shifting landscapes, otherworldly creatures, scalding acidic fluids, swirling plumes of volcanic gasses and particles, and crushing pressure of the overlying sea: what is not to like about active submarine volcanoes?

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18 November 2017

Our first discovery!

Immediately after we collected the new bathymetric survey over West Mata, we gridded it and made a comparison to the last survey in March 2016. To our delight, two areas with large depth changes jumped out of the comparison.

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17 November 2017

Beavers slapping tails on far-north waters

Animals the size of Labrador retrievers are changing the face of Alaska, creating new ponds visible from space.

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27 October 2017

Biographer profiles scientist-explorer of northeast Alaska

In the early 1900s, Ernest Leffingwell lived for nine summers and six winters in a cabin on Flaxman Island, a wedge of sand off Alaska’s northern coast 58 miles west of Kaktovik.

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16 October 2017

Getting ready for Antarctica

By Sarah Sams MAGIC-DML is an international collaboration focused on mapping, measuring, and modeling Antarctic geomorphology and ice change in Dronning Maud Land. The team has one austral field season under its belt and is in preparation for another this coming December through February. The week of October 2-8 was dedicated to preparing for the upcoming field season and reviewing progress from the previous one. The week began with a three-day …

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13 October 2017

From Geophysics Grad Student to Chief Scientist (for a Day)

Two years ago, before I became a graduate student, I would have never thought I would be at sea on a seismic research expedition.

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6 October 2017

Finding far-north lynx den part of cycle study

There, at the root ball of a downed balsam poplar, were six lynx kittens the size of yarn balls…

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29 September 2017

Prehistoric reptile one mile above McCarthy

It started in 1963, when 23-year-old geologist David Whistler sat down for lunch on a rocky hilltop one mile above Kennicott Glacier…

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28 September 2017

Planning to Get Underway

A typical research expedition has one or two chief scientists. Ours has 19…

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18 September 2017

Collecting unique data where the Atlantic Water meets the Arctic Ocean: A-TWAIN2017

Life on board RV Lance is very ‘koselig’ (cosy in Norwegian). Meals are served at fixed hours in the mess three times a day and coffee is always brewing.

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1 September 2017

Slicing a 20,000 year-old mammoth tusk

In his job as a university machinist, Dale Pomraning has built and fixed earthquake detectors and aurora rockets. But recently he worked on his first object that was once part of a living creature. He and others sliced a six-foot, 100-pound wooly mammoth tusk lengthwise, sort of like a salmon filet.

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2 August 2017

Water chemistry field work leads to startling discoveries!

As the summer draws to a close, I look back fondly on the field days I have had this summer, perhaps most fondly on June’s water chemistry field day.

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18 July 2017

The science before (and during) the storm – Part 2

Caught in the Storm By Robert Emberson Sampling landslides in the field varies in difficulty; some are high up on hillslopes or in the headwaters of steep catchments, while others tumble into easily accessed river valleys. When planning for such sampling, we had mainly anticipated that the weather would not be the biggest obstacle, but that’s what transpired for a major portion of our fieldwork in central Taiwan. The typical …

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11 July 2017

Deep thoughts from the Deep Blue Sea

As far as I can see from the ship to the horizon there is nothing but deep blue sea. Not a single ship has passed within sight since we left the north shore of Oahu.

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27 June 2017

We Probably Should Have Waterproofed That: Swimming in Bubbles

One of the more unique environments in Dominica are the marine fumeroles (underwater gas seeps) that occur mere steps from the beach. There are a few locations on the island that display this phenomenon; one of which is the appropriately-named Champagne Beach.

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26 June 2017

We Probably Should Have Waterproofed That: Welcome to Dominica!

Welcome to Dominica, the Nature Island! Located in the Lesser Antilles of the Caribbean Sea, Dominica (not to be confused with the Dominican Republic) is a tropical island with nine active volcanic centers and is a great place to study geology.

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26 May 2017

Glacier Benito Journal: Winding Up – Saturday 15th April

First excursion in the morning was by Marcos and Olaf to Level II Finger Lower Cairn to measure its position using the Survey GPS. After that they moved to Level I Finger Lower Cairn to repeat the survey activity.

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25 May 2017

Glacier Benito Journal: Crossing the Glacier and the Mavic Takes Off – Friday 14th April

The plan on Friday was conduct Mavic drone flying from the middle of Level II on the glacier. So at 0945, all five of us set off to point ‘403’.

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24 May 2017

Glacier Benito Journal: Finding the Level Markers – Thursday 13th April

Day three started the same as day two. Clear sky, moon providing the illumination before dawn, a sharp frost and no wind! Johnny, Olaf and Mark remained in camp to try to get the X8 drone up and flying.

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22 May 2017

Glacier Benito Journal: Arriving on Ice – Tuesday 11th April

The first of six magical days on the ice…

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