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You are browsing the archive for plainspoken scientist Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

20 November 2017

Science communication and policy workshops at #AGU17

Being able to effectively communicate your science is a crucial skill, no matter the audience. We’re offering two workshops, from general communication, to storytelling via multi- and social media. Register today!

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6 November 2017

#TalkClimateNow: Having Conversations about Climate Change

Waiting for that opportunity to talk about climate change with friends and family? That time is now!

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30 October 2017

Plain language supports science communication

By Kate Goggin. This post was originally published by the Center for Plain Language. I love helping scientists translate tech talk into plain language. Often the editing process goes smoothly, but sometimes, they have reservations. The fears I hear most often involve dumbing down the information, or, oversimplifying it. “Those are common complaints,” says Dr. Lisa DiPinto, Senior Scientist at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and one of my …

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23 October 2017

Geoscientist and singer-songwriter shares her creative side at AGU’s Open Mic Night – and you can, too!

Want to show off your creative side at AGU17? Perform at Open Mic Night!

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16 October 2017

Public outreach: Be mindful, not fearful

By Shane M Hanlon  One of the most important things to think about when reaching out, especially through means such as social or classic media, or writing letters to media outlets or journals, is that these mediums are public. What you say will be able to be seen by a wide audience and will be available to reference forever. This can be viewed as a barrier to prevent scientists from …

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28 September 2017

#dataviz – The (not really) new form a scicomm

Data can be more than numbers on a spreadsheet. It can tell a beautiful story.

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21 September 2017

Scicommer: Have message, will travel.

Why don’t departmental seminar series include scientists who do scicomm? I think they should.

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28 August 2017

Communicating uncertainty in research to the public

By Madeleine Jepsen. This is the second of a two-part series on communicating uncertainty.  Whether it’s a congressman drafting legislation or a family member asking about your research at Thanksgiving dinner, explaining uncertainty in research to a lay audience is an important part of science communication. Recently, Joseph Guillaume, a postdoctoral fellow at Aalto University, published an analysis of how uncertainty is verbally communicated in scientific publications using abstracts from …

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4 August 2017

Do you wanna write a blog post?!

We’re looking guest contributors to our blog!

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26 June 2017

A scicommer leaves Washington (temporarily)

By Shane M Hanlon I’m the Senior Specialist in AGU’s Sharing Science program. I giggle to myself on occasion when I hear it said aloud, not because of anything specific with the title or my duties therein, but because I am most comfortable with another title – scientist. I have a PhD in biology with a focus in disease ecology and ecotoxicology. I came into science communication and policy through …

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8 June 2017

Scientists Find Clouds full of Lollipop-Shaped Crystals

Some clouds are filled with lollipops (not really, but close)! A new Drawn to Geoscience by JoAnna Wendel.

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6 June 2017

So…you wanna host a Twitter takeover?

By Shane M Hanlon Recently, a new word has entered my lexicon: rocur. I’ve actually had discussions with colleagues responsible for copy editing and marketing about using this word, mainly along the lines of, “that’s not a word.” This has made me realize I’ve migrated from one bubble of scientific research in conservation biology to another that’s focused on communication, policy, and social media. So what does “rocur” mean? Well, …

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24 May 2017

Lucy Jones: scientists need to create “scientifically-defensible” stories

Scientists have an obligation to communicate what they know in a way that ensures it can be understood and acted upon by policymakers, seismologist Lucy Jones told attendees at the JpGU-AGU joint meeting this week.

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8 May 2017

Communicating science: four strategies to get the message across

By Mafalda Marques Carapuço Science communication is a challenging task as there is no universal solution that can be used in all cases. This is a major challenge for scientists who believe that communicating science to non-scientists is part of their social responsibility. To help scientists in the process of communicating science and fostering the transfer of scientific knowledge outside of the scientific community, four strategies can be adopted to …

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27 April 2017

Why some of the best March for Science signs were also the worst.

By Shane M Hanlon & Olivia V Ambrogio The March for Science was the largest gathering of scientists in our lifetimes (so far). Thousands of scientists turned out in cities around the world to stand up for strong science, and that was an impressive and inspiring thing to take part in. But a march isn’t just about the people, or the work they’ll (hopefully) continue to do afterwards to build …

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24 April 2017

What now? Now we go to work.

By Shane M Hanlon I’m a scientist who teaches scientists how to talk to non-scientists. I recognized the need for this type of instruction years ago when I was still a graduate student. Even when I first got my position in the Sharing Science program here at AGU, scientists were increasingly aware of the need to be able to effectively communicate their science to broad audiences but many were still …

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10 April 2017

Listening: The other half of science communication

Talk to strangers. Find common ground. Share the science. But start by listening.

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20 March 2017

Facebook Live for #scicomm

By Shane M Hanlon There are so many venues for science communication, especially when it comes to social media. For example, AGU alone has four official Twitter accounts (Sharing Science, AGU, Eos, Science Policy), an Instagram account, and a half-dozen Facebook pages. Social media is a powerful venue for communicating tips on communication. Twitter is an especially great place to learn about #scicomm resources and opportunities through hashtags like #scicomm, …

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13 December 2016

Cartoon: Scientist Inge Lehmann

By Miles Traer   Stanford University postdoc Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Follow him on Twitter @Geo_Miles

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16 November 2016

Drawn to Geoscience: Cartoons of Volcanoes

Our own JoAnna Wendel describes the process through which she drew a cartoon based on a research paper about volcanoes.

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