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2 December 2022

AntarcticLog: Diversifying Antarctica 

#AntarcticLog is a series of comics by Karen Romano Young. You can find the originals here. There are many efforts afoot to increase minority perspectives in the sciences. As we celebrate the 63rd anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty, which designated Antarctica as an international continent dedicated to knowledge and peace, we acknowledge the lack of diversity there — and elsewhere.   In my new project, I Was A Kid, which launched …

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25 November 2022

#AntarcticLog: Wonders of the World 

Don’t get me wrong. I don’t truly see the world through rose-colored glasses, as this comic may make it appear.  But I’m looking for hope wherever it may be found, including, this month, the COP27 gathering in Egypt. 

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18 November 2022

#AntarcticLog: Under the Sheet

Artist Karen Romano Young explores some of the secrets of the Antarctic ice sheet and how science helps reveal them.

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4 November 2022

#AntarcticLog: Trick of treat for UNICEF?

On Halloween I was doing a little research on Vanessa Nakate, the Ugandan climate change activist, and learned that she has become a spokesperson for Unicef.  Halloween… Unicef… climate and hunger? I switched gears quickly to create this trick-or-treat comic with a nod to my own early activist past. 

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28 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: Penguins!

Once upon a time, I had a penguin costume. I’ve learned that, when I go into the field with scientists, it’s never a bad idea to pack a costume. And that one has definitely had legs — short legs, for sure, but I’ve seen it in a number of videos, from penguin dances for International Penguin Day to open mic nights — penguin on saxophone, anyone?

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21 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: The Ant-Antarctic

This week, artist Karen Romano Young takes us to the Arctic, another area of the world especially affected by climate change.

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14 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: Breaking ice to do some science

You could call is bush-whacking. You could call it trail-blazing.  Or you could call it ice-breaking — and not in the sense of warming up a chilly party, either.  

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7 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: Back to the ice!

It’s springtime in Antarctica, and the scientists are heading back to the ice. Not only the scientists, but the support people working at the stations, and yes, even a few science communicators and artists. Among the first to travel to McMurdo and the South Pole in the wake of the Covid pandemic is Lauren Lipuma, editor of the U.S. Antarctic Program (and the National Science Foundation’s) newspaper, The Antarctic Sun.

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30 September 2022

#AntarcticLog: The wombat connection

I’m in Crownpoint, New Mexico this week, researching future comics at Navajo Technical University– and learned that the campus here used to have more trees. Piñon and juniper have died because of recent drought, says Abishek Roychowdhury, who teaches environmental science here. 

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16 September 2022

#AntarcticLog: The importance of research ships

I learn so much from drawing ships.  Here is E/V Nautilus, from an artist-in-residence and science communications tour I did in 2015. Nautilus is the mother ship to Hercules, a deep-diving ROV. 

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9 September 2022

#AntarcticLog: A close look at a glacier’s edge

The Alvin Science Verification Expedition may be over (science? verified!) but the research and findings are ongoing.  What’s more, the scientists aboard bring plenty of fascinating stories to the table — not all of them related to Alvin. 

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2 September 2022

#AntarcticLog: (Climate) refugees

More than the population of Australia. That’s how many people the United Nations Refugee Agency says are refugees. These numbers are unimaginable, inconceivable, and overwhelming. 

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26 August 2022

#AntarcticLog: Finishing up with Alvin

Hello from the tail end of the Alvin Science Verification Expedition, in which we worked to verify the submersible Alvin’s ability to carry scientists, their equipment, and samples to depths of 6500 meters.  The upshot: human-operated vehicle HOV Alvin is ready, willing, and able indeed. 

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19 August 2022

#AntarcticLog: Alvin dive 5101

Greetings once again from sea, this time the Caribbean Sea, off the Cayman Islands to be precise, way down deep at the Mid-Cayman Rise.  Today is Alvin dive 5101, on the Beebe Vent Field (named for the deep-sea pioneer William Beebe who, with Otis Barton, descended 417m in the bathysphere in 1930, the year Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution was founded), the deepest known hydrothermal vents in the world. Wonder what we’ll find… 

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22 July 2022

#AntarticLog: To sea we go!

And now for something completely different. #AntarcticLog heads to the deep sea, where carbon sinks, where the sea is black, and where the tiny submersible Alvin — able to carry three people — will soon be shining its light on unseen territory. 

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15 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Summertime

By Karen Romano Young The question of summer Arctic ice extent is up in the air — not to say it’s unknown.  NASA goes to extra effort to assure the detailed accuracy of its measurements, including a new effort beginning this summer.  Given the 40-plus-year coverage from space provided by the ICESat satellites, including ICESat-2, placed in orbit in 2018,  our understanding of the volume of sea ice is exquisite any time …

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8 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Invisible Volcanoes

Artist Karen Roman Young shows us what we can learn about the below-ice geology of Marie Byrd Land in Antarctica.

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1 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Six years of science comics

Karen Romano Young shares highlights of her (now six!) years of drawing the Antarctic Log.

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24 June 2022

#AntarcticLog: Picturing time

How do you picture time? Does that seem like a strange notion? Not to a visual storyteller like me. Is time a wheel? a sphere? a line? a line with wrinkles? (Don’t forget, I’m a children’s book author, too.)  

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17 June 2022

#AntarcticLog: Advocating on behalf of coral

Presenting…Cindi Punihaole, the Program Director of ReefTeach, a coral reef advocate — making a public policy difference as well as a personal impact — at Kahalu’u Bay, Mission Blue newest Hope Spot.  Cindi — who has lived and relied on the Bay all her life, has observed the changes taking place there over recent decades, as the sea level has risen, sea temperature and acidity have soared, and the number of tourists visiting the Big Island of Hawaii has skyrocketed. 

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