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29 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: A small piece about a big deal

Artist Karen Romano Young explains through SciArt why tiny krill are a big deal for Antarctic food webs (and penguins, seals, orcas–and scientists).

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22 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: Watch Your Language

#AntarcticLog is a series of comics by Karen Romano Young. You can find the originals here. Last week I posted about how I try to find the best visual image to convey the main point of a comic or visual story.  This week I’m sharing just one image — an introduction to the JOIDES Resolution and Expedition #379, in which I took part three years ago, in 2019. I continue to …

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11 February 2022

February birthdays – the discipline of oceanography and early NOAA organizations

The month of February is a month with some significant beginnings in ocean science

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19 February 2020

Ocean Sciences 2020 – Oceanography in Space

Working together, planetary and ocean scientists can utilize oceanographic knowledge to plan future missions to explore ocean worlds, while doing some reverse engineering to study our own planet.

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Shark may avoid cold blood by holding its breath on deep dives

Scalloped hammerhead sharks stay warm as they descend into cold, deep water off the coast of Hawaii, suggesting the cold-blooded species may maintain its body temperature on dives by holding its breath, according to new research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting 2020 in San Diego, California.

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13 September 2018

The Blob hides in the deep

Fall is nearly here and, for most of us, that means the end of the summer heatwave. In the waters of British Columbia, however, the seasonal cycle is stuck. A marine heatwave began more than four years ago and new research suggests it won’t be disappearing anytime soon. Marine heatwaves are not new. But heatwaves are getting more intense and more frequent with a changing climate. Over the fall and winter of 2013 and 2014, satellites detected above normal temperatures in the surface waters of the northeast Pacific. At its peak, the mass of warm water—nicknamed “The Blob”—had water temperatures up to 3 °C warmer than normal and covered an area larger than Australia.

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15 December 2016

Some corals and scallops better able to handle ocean acidification, study finds

Some coral and mollusk species are adjusting to acidifying ocean waters better than previously thought, according to new research.

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9 November 2015

Tamu Massif: Closing thoughts from Chief Scientist Dr. William Sager

This is the last post in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor. The crew is on 36-day research trip to study Tamu Massif, a massive underwater volcano, located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan in the Shatsky Rise.

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16 March 2014

Taking Google Earth beyond the “dirt”

In 2006, oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle had a conversation with the Google Earth and Maps director that set our Google views on an exciting path forward.  Dr. Earle stated (in her words from a blog post): “You should call Google Earth ‘Google Dirt’. What about the ¾ of the planet that is blue?”  Zip forward to February 2009, when Google launched Ocean in Google Earth which now allows us to …

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22 October 2013

Skype in the Classroom – Exploring Oceans

Inspired by Fabien Cousteau’s record-breaking Mission 31 expedition, starting November 1st, Skype in the Classroom will set sail on a month-long exploration of the oceans with Skype lessons from marine scientists and oceanographers from all over the world. Learn more at:  https://education.skype.com/exploringoceans Teachers (it looks like it is designed for K-12 audiences) can take students on the “ultimate field trip” and learn about everything from deep sea creatures that glow in the …

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