Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for ocean science Archives - Page 2 of 18 - AGU Blogosphere.

3 August 2020

Postcards from a (formerly) frozen icebreaker: Part 41

“…out here in our Arctic bubble there are actually days that I don’t even think about the coronavirus. It doesn’t even pop into my head. I guess this would be impossible at home. But out here there is no virus, no social distance needed.”

Read More >>


22 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 40

Another day of intense sun and this changes the surface in dramatic ways. The snow is melting fast. We’ve put down some boards to minimize melt near the tower, and these work, but the snow all around melts, leaving pillars with boards on top.

Read More >>


21 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 39

There are these beautiful days out over the Arctic ice. Vibrant blue sky with a piercing sun. Today was one of those days. Warm out, and the sun overpowering. Just like with a strong wind, I found myself turning away from the sun when possible. When facing the sun it feels like my skin is cooking.

Read More >>


20 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 38

If the ice decides to come together, it will simply destroy anything in its way. That’s what happened to our so-called ASFS50 station. A 1000-pound station flipped upside down by the ice back during Leg 2.

Read More >>


19 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 37

The ice around us, at least on the Fortress, is filthy. In many locations it is brown with sediment. Many small rocks have been found, suggesting that this ice was initially formed as land-fast ice along the Siberian Shelf. A recent satellite radar image shows that this floe is somewhat different from the ice around us.

Read More >>


18 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 36

Wow, it has been intense out. The skies cleared, leaving us bathed in full sun all day. Full bright sun, nearly twice as bright as a typical sunny day back home because of the high albedo surface. Photons coming in from all directions. It’s time to make sure you’ve got your sunscreen and sunglasses that can black out all stray light.

Read More >>


17 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 35

We ran into the floe. Directly. While scientifically we decided it would be best to moor to the floe along the ship’s port side to facilitate CTD operations, others onboard have been concerned about the Polarstern’s ability to hold its position alongside the floe in the face of ice pressure.

Read More >>


16 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 34

The new character of this floe revealed itself in the first steps. Schlump, schlump. Through shin-deep snow into a blue slush below. Most steps were this way for our full 3-hour tour.

Read More >>


15 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 33

There hasn’t been much to be excited about lately, but the through of stepping off the ship onto our floe again is very exciting. Time to get after it once again. We’ve been busily planning our coming moves. How will we modify the set up to be lighter on the ice and more nimble.

Read More >>


14 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 32

Our first solid reference came when we found the “Monster,” which is a large buoy installation that was on the edge of camp. Then some smaller stations for measuring ice temperature and optics… then, there in the distance, was our flux station. Standing proud. I knew it would be there because I’ve been tracking the data… But somehow still, the visual contact was so relieving.

Read More >>


13 July 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 31

Last night we did have a visitor, two actually. A mom and a cub. Such a tiny little cub, born earlier this year. They walked all around the ship, up on top of ridges hopping between little floes, peeking out from behind blocks of ice. This must be such a curious site for them.

Read More >>


15 June 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 30

Anchors up, and underway. After a few days of turnover, we are now on our way. We’ve said goodbye to our Leg3 colleagues, after absorbing as much information as possible on their experiences, the state of the instrumentation, and ideas on how to proceed.

Read More >>


14 June 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 29

After 5.5 weeks in transit, we are finally onboard of Polarstern. What a long journey it has been just to get to this point…. And our journey is really just beginning…

Read More >>


13 June 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 28

As we wait here…. For an excruciatingly long time to rendezvous with Polarstern, there has been some moderately good news. The sea-ice melt season has started out at the MOSAiC floe. I wish we were there with the full arsenal of observations and samples.

Read More >>


12 June 2020

Postcards from a frozen icebreaker — Part 27

Polarstern is making slow progress as it tries to leave the ice. Funny how the ice has drifted so fast this year, and broken up so much. Yet it still has a firm grip on Polarstern. Not wanting to let her pass easily to the edge.

Read More >>


18 May 2020

How climate killed corals

New study shows multiple factors joined forces to devastate the Great Barrier Reef in 2016.

Read More >>


6 May 2020

Going against the trend

Global warming has affected the entire planet’s surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which until 2015 had bucked the trend. A research team has now unraveled what was going on.

Read More >>


8 April 2020

Shelf sediments, freshwater runoff from rivers brings more carbon, nutrients to North Pole

Freshwater runoff from rivers and continental shelf sediments are bringing significant quantities of carbon and trace elements into parts of the Arctic Ocean via the Transpolar Drift—a major surface current that moves water from Siberia across the North Pole to the North Atlantic Ocean.

Read More >>


3 April 2020

Lessons from bones, dusty and stinky

In her studies, Misarti and her colleagues found that walrus in the distant past ate a larger variety of food than they do today. Walrus eat clams almost exclusively these days, but in the past their diets may have included more fish, seabirds and even seals.

Read More >>


17 February 2020

Deep-sea footage helps researchers understand octopod real estate

Biologists are using footage from remotely operated vehicles to better understand where deep-sea octopuses prefer to live. Understanding an animal’s choice of habitat is crucial to understanding its life history. Abigail Pratt, a biologist at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, has been crawling through undersea video footage from the North Atlantic Ocean to better understand where deep-sea octopuses prefer to settle down. Pratt is hoping to find out what seafloor features make the best real estate – whether octopuses prefer hard ground or soft, or whether they tend to settle on specific geographical features like submarine canyons or continental shelves.

Read More >>