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31 January 2019

Beach building is keeping the Atlantic Coast from going under

The artificial build-up of beaches is buffering the U.S. Atlantic coastline against the effects of sea level rise, but that benefit may not last as sand gets harder to come by in the coming decades.

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11 January 2019

Barrier island sand dunes recover at different rates after hurricanes

Sand dunes on coastal barrier islands buffer the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts from oncoming hurricanes. Every year, millions of public and private dollars fund the restoration of these barrier islands, but managers often focus on the recovery of smaller sand dunes and aim at making them bigger, for better storm protection. But new research presented at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting last month finds sand dunes on these barrier islands don’t all recover at the same rate. Small dunes go back to becoming small dunes; large dunes recover to be large dunes; and they don’t typically grow larger than they were before the storm struck.

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7 May 2018

Powerful hurricanes strengthen faster now than 30 years ago

Hurricanes that intensify rapidly – a characteristic of almost all powerful hurricanes – do so more strongly and quickly now than they did 30 years ago, according to a new study. Many factors are at play, but the chief driver of more rapid hurricane intensification is a natural climate cycle known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) that affects water temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean where hurricanes form, according to the study’s authors.

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9 January 2018

Study suggests heavy rains from tropical cyclones distort the ground below

Earth’s surface is constantly shifting, expanding and compressing in response to atmospheric and hydrologic forces from aboveground. A new study finds that compression of Earth’s crust is correlated with heavy rainfall from hurricanes and typhoons, known collectively as tropical cyclones. The added weight of all that water likely causes the ground underneath the storm to deform, according to the study’s authors.

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22 December 2017

People return to flawed places because they do

As a child, Deb Long spent many hours at the post office in Ester, Alaska. Her mother Ruth was the postmaster there. As an adult, she has settled into a funky little house that stands on brick legs in the Holy Cross section of New Orleans.

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21 September 2017

Hurricanes and far north sea ice

Hurricanes don’t happen in Alaska because those storms are tropical by nature, but typhoons (another word for hurricanes) sometimes track north into the Bering Sea…

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8 September 2017

Update #5: Hurricane Irma strengthening, watch some cool visuals

As Hurricane Irma barrels through the Caribbean and towards the mainland U.S.A., AGU wants to keep you updated with what scientists are talking about now. Check back for updates on science happening now from Eos staff writer JoAnna Wendel and science writer Larry O’Hanlon.

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22 December 2016

Humidity may cloud sediment deposits used to study storms

Using sediment as an indicator of past hurricanes may not work well in hot, humid environments, a new study finds. The finding could change the way scientists hunt for evidence of past storms, according to the study’s authors.

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29 March 2016

New satellite could provide better data for hurricane prediction

The launch of the GOES-R geostationary satellite in October 2016 could herald a new era for predicting hurricanes, a new study finds. The wealth of information from this new satellite, at time and space scales not previously possible, combined with advanced statistical hurricane prediction models, could enable more accurate predictions in the future, according to the researchers.

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