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You are browsing the archive for Geophysical Research Letters Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

12 July 2022

AGU Acceleration to Open Access with Geophysical Research Letters transition

AGU is committed to the principles of open science and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) data.  To support that, over the last decade, AGU has begun to shift its journals to open access as part of our mission to support a global community in advancing Earth and space sciences. Today nine of our 23 journals are fully open access, and nearly half of all articles in AGU journals are …

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10 March 2020

Major Greenland glacier collapse 90 years ago linked to climate change

Ninety years ago there were no satellites to detect changes in Greenland’s coastal glaciers, but a new study combining historical photos with evidence from ocean sediments suggests climate change was already at work in the 1930s and led to a major collapse of the one of Greenland’s largest coastal glaciers.

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15 January 2020

Air Pollution from Oil and Gas Production Sites Visible from Space

Between 2007 and 2019, across much of the United States, nitrogen dioxide pollution levels dropped because of cleaner cars and power plants, the team found, confirming findings reported previously. The clean air trend in satellite data was most obvious in urban areas of California, Washington and Oregon and in the eastern half of the continental United States… However, several areas stuck out with increased emissions of nitrogen dioxide: The Permian, Bakken and Eagle Ford oil and gas basins, in Texas and New Mexico, North Dakota, and Texas, respectively.

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26 December 2019

Forces from Earth’s spin may spark earthquakes and volcanic eruptions at Mount Etna

A new study suggests that polar motion and subsequent shifts in Earth’s crust may increase volcanic activity. “I find it quite exciting to know that while climate drives Earth’s spin, its rotation can also drive volcanoes and seismicity,” said Sébastien Lambert, a geophysicist at Paris Observatory in France and lead author of the study. The new findings, however, don’t allow scientists to forecast volcanic activity.

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3 December 2019

New study finds the mix that makes Titan’s lakes spew nitrogen bubbles

In a new study published in AGU’s journal Geophysical Research Letters, researchers simulated Titan’s lakes in a pressurized chamber. They found the right combination of methane, ethane and nitrogen crucial for bubbles to form. It is possible these bubble outbreaks are strong enough to shape river deltas in bodies of liquid on the moon.

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11 November 2019

Advancing spring warmth could disrupt species migration, development

In a new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists found that in many areas of the U.S. springtime temperature thresholds important for plant and animal life cycles occur between six to 20 days earlier in the season than they did 70 years ago.

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5 November 2019

Satellite tracking shows how ships affect clouds and climate

By matching the movement of ships to the changes in clouds caused by their emissions, researchers have shown how strongly the two are connected.

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27 August 2019

Scientists forecasted late May tornado outbreak nearly four weeks before it ripped through U.S.

“This is the first documented successful long-range forecast for an extended period of tornado activity in the U.S.,” said lead author Victor Gensini, a professor of meteorology at Northern Illinois University.

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26 August 2019

Climate change is altering winter precipitation across the Northern Hemisphere

A team of scientists has successfully teased out the influence of human-caused climate change on wintertime precipitation over much of the last century, showing that the warming climate is significantly altering wintertime rainfall and snowfall across the Northern Hemisphere.

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26 June 2019

Climate change is transforming northernmost Arctic landscapes

Isachsen, a permafrost monitoring site that sits at a latitude of 78 degrees north on the Arctic Canadian island of Ellef Ringnes, seemed like the last place that would feel the effects of climate change.

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7 June 2019

Climate change may shift timing of summer thunderstorms

Climate change could affect the regularity of summer afternoon thunderstorms in some parts of the world, according to new research. A new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters modeled weather patterns in western Germany, northern France and parts of Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg, under climate change.

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8 May 2019

A new view of wintertime air pollution

The processes that create ozone pollution in the summer can also trigger the formation of wintertime air pollution, according to a new study led by CIRES and NOAA researchers. The team’s unexpected finding suggests that in the U.S. West and elsewhere, certain efforts to reduce harmful wintertime air pollution could backfire.

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29 April 2019

Un nuevo estudio profundiza en las Nubes de Venus

Investigadores han logrado visualizar lo que sucede en las nubes intermedias de esta gruesa capa en el atmosfero de Venus gracias a imágenes en infrarrojo, y se han topado con sorpresas.

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New research takes deeper look at Venus’s clouds

Researchers have used infrared images to spy into the middle layer of Venus’s clouds and they have found some unexpected surprises.

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6 December 2018

Scientists find causes of firenado in deadly Carr Fire

Climate, weather set the stage for uncontrollable inferno in Redding, California.

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31 October 2018

Not all coral reef islands may disappear with rising seas

Rising sea levels associated with climate change may not drown all coral reef islands, according to new research.

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4 September 2018

Polluted groundwater likely contaminated South Pacific Ocean coral reefs for decades

Groundwater containing excess nitrogen from agricultural fertilizers likely contaminated coral reefs on the Cook Islands during the second half of the 20th century, continuing for years after fertilizer use stopped, according to a new study. The finding suggests human activities have long-lasting impacts on coral reef communities and could be contributing to their decline.

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6 December 2017

Scientists capture Earth’s “hum” on ocean floor

Researchers have successfully quantified Earth’s vibrational “hum” using seismic instruments on the bottom of the ocean. A new study determined at the ocean bottom the frequencies at which the Earth naturally vibrates, and confirmed the viability of using ocean instruments to study the phenomenon.

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5 December 2017

Dark fiber: Using sensors beneath our feet to tell us about earthquakes, water and other geophysical phenomena

Scientists have shown for the first time that dark fiber – the vast network of unused fiber-optic cables installed throughout the country and the world – can be used as sensors for detecting earthquakes, the presence of groundwater, changes in permafrost conditions, and a variety of other subsurface activity.

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21 November 2017

Moon’s Crust Underwent Resurfacing after Forming from Magma Ocean

A research team took to the lab to recreate the magmatic melt that once formed the lunar surface and uncovered new insights on how the modern moonscape came to be. Their study found found that one of the great mysteries of the lunar body’s formation – how it could develop a crust composed largely of just one mineral – cannot be explained by the initial crust formation and must have been the result of some secondary event.

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