Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Fall Meeting Archives - Page 2 of 3 - AGU Blogosphere.

15 December 2016

Dr. G’s #AGU16 Spotlight – Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell

Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell thanks scientists for all that we do, to stay the course, and to think about how to move forward with our communications

Read More >>


14 December 2016

Cartoon: Recreating the hydrothermal soup of life

Recreating adorable life on Earth and elsewhere.

Read More >>


13 December 2016

Cartoon: Ancient Romans have invaded #AGU16

Yes, it involves a tardis.

Read More >>


3 November 2016

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting!

Planning your AGU16 schedule? Be sure to check out the Sharing Science Room for all the science communication, policy, and outreach events!

Read More >>


1 February 2016

What happened to Ms. Gottschalk? Fall Meeting!

By Larry O’Hanlon A couple of weeks ago on this blog we shared some great student vlogging of AGU Fall Meeting experiences. At that time I noticed something peculiar about the vlogs of Portland State University undergraduate student Kimberly Gottschalk. In each new vlog post her appearance changed. She started with an almost a Victorian formality on the first day, and transformed gradually into what I suspect is her more …

Read More >>


22 December 2015

Visualizing Data Science

This is part of a new series of posts that highlight the importance of Earth and space science data and its contributions to society. Posts in this series showcase data facilities and data scientists; explain how Earth and space science data is collected, managed and used; explore what this data tells us about the planet; and delve into the challenges and issues involved in managing and using data. This series …

Read More >>


17 December 2015

Music of the Earth

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


Beware the Icebergs of Pluto

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


Ceres vs. The Death Star

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


Cartooning the AGU Fall Meeting

Stanford University’s Miles Traer explains how he cartoons about the science at the AGU Fall Meeting.

Read More >>


Hillslopes and Hobbes

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


16 December 2015

Medieval solution to climate change

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


15 December 2015

Cold reaction has hot implications for evolution of life

When carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas mingle deep underground, they transform into methane and water—the building blocks of life.

Scientists once thought the reaction, called Sabatier synthesis, could only proceed above 150 degrees Celsius. Life, they thought, was conceived deep in the scalding vents of an ancient ocean. But the Sabatier process also runs cooler, finds a new study presented at the 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. With the right catalyst, the reaction works at room temperature, the study found.

Read More >>


Dream Car Type-S

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


Big bad space wolf

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


Space Engineers

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


14 December 2015

ACME solution to gas leaks

Stanford University’s Miles Traer, once again, is cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


Waves on Titan

Stanford University’s Miles Traer is, once again, cartooning from the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

Read More >>


2 November 2015

Showing by (simply) telling

Why did I decide to submit an abstract for the “Up-Goer Five Giving-It-a-Try” session at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting, which challenges scientists to explain their work using only the 1,000 most common words in the English language? Well, I’m already presenting my research for the meeting, so I’ve got the talk outline and figures already queued up. That made my decision easier. But, what I really wanted was to see whether I could translate my work into simplified language. Scientists love jargon, but I think it’s equally as fun to discover just how common (or uncommon) even basic geology-related words are. All I can say is that it’s lucky “rock” is one of those words, or it would have been really hard to write my abstract in Up-Goer language!

Read More >>


27 October 2015

Ignite a crowd, in just 5 minutes, at the AGU Fall Meeting

Scientists are increasingly encouraged to share the meaning and implications of their research with non-scientists. And, as many who have attempted this endeavor at a party or a Thanksgiving dinner table know, talking about scientific research with those outside your field is difficult. Yet, it can be fun and rewarding.

Being able to convey the details and importance of your work can help to boost public support for science, enhance your career prospects and improve your chances of finding funding. Communication is a skill not typically taught as part of scientific training, but training and practice can help you communicate more effectively.

Ignite@AGU is one such opportunity for researchers to hone their communication skills and become more comfortable talking about their work with diverse audiences. Similar to a TED talk, Ignite gives presenters just five minutes and 20 auto-advancing slides to make their point.

Read More >>