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19 November 2017

What is so interesting about submarine volcanoes?

Jagged piles of molten rock, sulfurous smoke, exploding gaseous emissions, shifting landscapes, otherworldly creatures, scalding acidic fluids, swirling plumes of volcanic gasses and particles, and crushing pressure of the overlying sea: what is not to like about active submarine volcanoes?

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18 November 2017

Our first discovery!

Immediately after we collected the new bathymetric survey over West Mata, we gridded it and made a comparison to the last survey in March 2016. To our delight, two areas with large depth changes jumped out of the comparison.

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3 November 2017

When Jerry Brown came to Nome

The California governor was stopping in Nome on his way to a meeting in Russia. The 79-year-old environmentalist and leader of a state that resembles a progressive nation wanted to learn why the far north matters. He had never been to the Arctic or Alaska before.

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2 November 2017

Unique imaging of a dinosaur’s skulls tells evolutionary tale

How could paleontologists peer inside the skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosaur to determine the size of this bone-crusher’s brain and the layout of other features…without damaging this rare, stunning and toothy treasure?

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1 November 2017

In Biblical Land, Searching for Droughts Past and Future

Perched on a cliff face in Israel’s Negev Desert, close to where the book of Genesis says the wicked cities of Sodom and Gomorrah were burned with divine fire, geologist Steven Goldstein was excitedly uncovering evidence of events even more ancient.

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13 October 2017

Algae’s athletic role in glacier melt

Life exists everywhere you look. Even on glacier ice, home to inch-long worms, snow fleas, bacteria and algae.

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De Estudiante De Geofísica a Jefe Científico (por un Día)

Hace dos años, antes de convertirme en estudiante de posgrado, nunca habría pensado que estaría en el mar en una expedición de investigación sísmica.

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6 October 2017

Finding far-north lynx den part of cycle study

There, at the root ball of a downed balsam poplar, were six lynx kittens the size of yarn balls…

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29 September 2017

Prehistoric reptile one mile above McCarthy

It started in 1963, when 23-year-old geologist David Whistler sat down for lunch on a rocky hilltop one mile above Kennicott Glacier…

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28 September 2017

Planning to Get Underway

A typical research expedition has one or two chief scientists. Ours has 19…

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13 September 2017

Journeying to Earth’s Interior on a Mountain in British Columbia

I spent several days last week on the summit of Monarch Mountain in the company of two Texas A&M University geophysicists and one undergraduate.

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17 August 2017

Hike across Alaska ends with after-dinner bear

There, we reached mile 0 of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline and the finish of a south-to-north walk across Alaska, most of it on the service road that parallels the pipeline.

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11 August 2017

Final steps to Mile 0 of summer walk

I said goodbye to my final hiking partner today outside a van on the side of a gravel highway. For the remaining 40 miles in my summer hike along the path of the Trans-Alaska Highway, it will be just Cora and me.

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4 August 2017

In fifth month, Trans-Alaska hike nears end

We just passed Trans-Alaska Pipeline mile 100, which means that distance remains on our summer hike from Valdez to Prudhoe Bay. My dog Cora and I started walking on April 30, which means we’re in our fifth month of sleeping outside.

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18 July 2017

The science before (and during) the storm – Part 2

Caught in the Storm By Robert Emberson Sampling landslides in the field varies in difficulty; some are high up on hillslopes or in the headwaters of steep catchments, while others tumble into easily accessed river valleys. When planning for such sampling, we had mainly anticipated that the weather would not be the biggest obstacle, but that’s what transpired for a major portion of our fieldwork in central Taiwan. The typical …

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29 June 2017

We Probably Should Have Waterproofed That: Terrestrial Volcanism

Yesterday we were investigating marine volcanism via underwater fumaroles, and today we’re exploring the terrestrial side of Dominica! Scott Brame, a professor at Clemson University, took us to some of the most interesting geological features this volcanic island has to offer.

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26 June 2017

We Probably Should Have Waterproofed That: Welcome to Dominica!

Welcome to Dominica, the Nature Island! Located in the Lesser Antilles of the Caribbean Sea, Dominica (not to be confused with the Dominican Republic) is a tropical island with nine active volcanic centers and is a great place to study geology.

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23 June 2017

A restock and recharge along the pipeline’s path

I’ve been in Alaska’s second-largest city for a few days now, resupplying for the trip north as I hike with my dog on the path of the Trans-Alaska pipeline. Three hundred fifty miles down, 450 to go.

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30 May 2017

Glacier Benito Journal: Observation, Final Words & Acknowledgements

I realised how lucky I am to have observed the glacier in 1972/73 and to have photographed the glacier extensively then so that I was able to show to others one of the demonstratable effects of climate change.

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29 May 2017

Glacier Benito Journal: Departure – Sunday 16th April

The weather was still excellent for our final day for departure. I was tempted to stay one day longer but one should not tempt ‘fate’ even if the weather on Monday was going to be good.

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