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You are browsing the archive for climate change Archives - Page 2 of 32 - AGU Blogosphere.

6 May 2022

#AntarcticLog: A Reef Called HOPE

#AntarcticLog is a series of comics by Karen Romano Young. You can find the originals here. You know, writing about climate change is a struggle.  I want to share the information kids and other people need (in my view) while trying not to send their outlook through the floor.  Among the most dire stories come from coral reefs — so vital, so damaged, and so at risk.  And yet there’s incredible …

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29 April 2022

1-True story: Slapped by a (misinformation) shark

David Shiffman is a shark guy. It’s in his Twitter handle, he’s writing a book about it, and he was wearing a shark shirt the day we interviewed him. But more broadly he’s a marine conservation biologist, meaning he studies all sorts of ocean-going animals.

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22 April 2022

True (science) stories you’ve never heard before

Third Pod from the Sun is back, and we’re going weekly! Join us as we combat misconceptions about sharks, learn how to lasso lizards, hear from a Martian here on Earth, spark science joy via Tiktok, journey to Antarctica, and fight over food with some capuchins!

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His 48th summer on top of the world

This June, George Divoky will refurbish a cabin that sits on a lonely gravel island north of Alaska. He was not planning a remodel this year. Sometime during the winter, a polar bear tore through a plywood wall of the cabin Divoky moved 20 years ago to Cooper Island.

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15 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: Getting Graphic

At times the trouble isn’t finding science stories, it’s finding how to tell them. In comics, the words are vital, but the images are, dare I say, even more important.  Why? Because they’re what catches your attention, clues you in, inviting you to read, and — in the best cases — they work to convey aspects of the science that just wouldn’t work as well in words. And, as experts in science education and communication know, the more modes you use to tell the story, the more eyes you’re going to get on your work. 

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8 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: Not just for kids

Illustrated stories are for kids, right? Not right at all! People of all ages read, laugh and cry over, learn from, and love pictures.  

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1 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: A Lite-Brite of SciArt

I got my start at Scholastic News, a classroom magazine for 11 and 12-year-olds that covered everything — so I had to interview everyone who was making news. I quickly realized that the people I liked talking to the most were scientists. They were the most passionate, the most enthralled, and they had the biggest lives — even as they focused on a small research topic or specific geographic area. To me they were dots of light that — like the Lite-Brite toy I’d grown up with — formed pictures. 

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18 March 2022

#AntarcticLog: (Climate) refugees

Sometimes there just aren’t words to express my response to what’s going on. That’s what led me to comics in the first place — a grievous story of walrus stranded by climate change — and it’s what leads me on. What “does not compute” in words can make a connection in visuals. 

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11 March 2022

#AntarcticLog: Coming together for science

My Twitter feed is full of calls for peace. And last week’s #AntarcticLog post had a call for “more science!” Coming right up. Actually, Antarctica is proof that we can have peace and science, and that the countries of the world can come together to secure it. 

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4 March 2022

#AntarcticLog: A season at Palmer Station

Palmer is on Anvers Island on the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, a prime location for biology, such as Oregon State University researcher Thomas DesVignes’ study of icefish, aided by fishing from the deck of the Laurence M. Gould. Palmer’s supply ship…

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25 February 2022

#AntarcticLog: Give me Shackleton

What can I say — Ernest Shackleton just kills me. Yes, Roald Amundsen was the first to reach the South Pole, and by goal-oriented criteria was the most successful. In a certain kind of heroic sense, Scott wins many hearts.  But, as the saying goes, “Give me Shackleton.” He’s the one who got every single man of the Transantarctic Expedition home alive, though he left their ship, Endurance, to the Weddell Sea. 

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24 February 2022

The A57 Snake Pass – closed by three landslides

The A57 Snake Pass between Sheffield and Manchester in England has been closed for at least a month by three rainfall induced landslides.

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18 February 2022

#AntarcticLog: Being a Roughneck

Meet Ian Cortez, a roughneck (driller) working to bring sediment up from the seafloor to give scientists data that will allow them to tell the story of Antarctica’s deep past. Ian’s a second-generation roughneck, inspired by his father, who did as Ian is doing — leaving home and family in the Philippines to work at sea aboard the JR. 

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11 February 2022

#AntarcticLog: Where is that giant ice chunk now?

How long has that big chunk of Larsen C ice shelf called A-68A been floating around the Southern Ocean? Almost the whole time I’ve been drawing #AntarcticLog comics. Number 7 reported on its calving in the Weddell Sea.  Some chunk! Its area was equivalent to the entire state of Delaware. 

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31 January 2022

Thirty years on semi-solid ground

At the end of this month, Vladimir Romanovsky will retire after 30 years as a professor and permafrost scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute. This comes at a time when people — finally — no longer squint at him with a puzzled look when he mentions what he studies.

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28 January 2022

#AntarcticLog: How much? How Fast?

How Much? How Fast? 

That’s the big question International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration scientists are digging into as they explore above, below, and beyond this immense, powerful, thawing glacier. 

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21 January 2022

#AntarcticLog: Giant glaciers & robotic friends

My post last week included a big comic about Julia Wellner and the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration (ITGC).  It featured a tiny comic showing Ran, the Hugin AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) that would become the first robot to explore under the glacier. 

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17 January 2022

#AntarcticLog: Crossing the Drake Passsage

Why did the Nathaniel B. Palmer cross the Drake Passage? To get to the other side… Antarctica, that is — and to carry the International Thwaites Glacier Collaborative (ITGC) scientists to their research sites in the Amundsen Sea. 

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7 January 2022

#AntarcticLog: Happy New Year!

New Year’s is a great time for a life review — a look at past, present, and future.  First, here’s a peek at Antarctic auld lang syne, in the form of ancient penguins. 

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1 January 2022

A New Year’s resolution: Climate action

There are so many topics and efforts that deserve our attention – how can we possibly select which one (or more than one) to declare as a New Year’s resolution? One can’t go wrong with increasing our actions relating to addressing climate change.

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