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You are browsing the archive for citizen science Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

28 December 2020

Community (citizen) science – latest from NASA and iSeeChange

ISeeChange and the NASA Citizen Science portfolio of programs are excellent for faculty to think about utilizing as a way to engage students in their local environments, especially during remote/online instruction, and can serve as a foundation for undergraduate research efforts.

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4 March 2018

Turn your students into citizen scientists with the mPING app

Help NOAA scientists improve observations with your own reports of ground precipitation submitted through the mPING app

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3 August 2017

Help NASA collect 2017 Solar Eclipse data

The 2017 solar eclipse presents many opportunities for everyone to get involved in doing science before/during/after the eclipse. NASA has collected a number of citizen science programs at every level from the most basic observations to publishable research opportunities in partnership with NASA and university scientists.

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13 April 2016

National Citizen Science Day 2016

This year marks the first annual National Citizen Science Day (OK – so the “Day” is extending from April 16 to May 21, 2016). Organized by the Citizen Science Association (CSA) and SciStarter, it is an opportunity for individuals and organizations to come together and promote, celebrate, and/or participate in citizen science activities.

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20 December 2014

Dr. G’s #AGU14 Spotlight – Citizen Science

The AGU Fall Meeting called attention to the growing opportunities and benefits of citizen science – especially work at the global level. Read about high altitude citizen science and the work of Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation.

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18 February 2014

How hard has your zip code shaken?

Did you feel it? …Ever? These USGS maps show the highest shaking intensity reported in every zip code throughout the U.S. (and cities of the world) in the past two decades. 1991 – 2012  The USGS’s crowd-sourced Community Internet Intensity Maps, popularly known as “Did-You-Feel-It” maps, have been collecting online surveys of seismic shaking intensity since 1997. There’ve been plenty of quakes in that time, and in 2012 researchers put together …

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