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29 May 2022

Ships returning to Cape Town – H.M.S. Challenger and JOIDES Resolution

Cape Town has served as a port of call for these two scientific vessels and others, playing an important role in supporting science at sea.

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26 March 2022

The science communications from H.M.S. Challenger were “Good Words” and more

Scientists on the first oceanographic expedition realized how important it was to engage in science communication and storytelling outside of their science circles, while at sea and upon returning home. This is a good reminder that we need to continue to build upon those early messages sent via snail mail, using our modern-day technologies, to share our oceanographic work with others. Communications, no matter what the tool utilized, is key to education, engagement, excitement, and increasing science literacy across all audiences.

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18 March 2022

The missions of H.M.S. Challenger and JOIDES Resolution – a comparison of ocean exploration then and now

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the departure of the first ocean research expedition, H.M.S. Challenger. This year is when I am departing on JOIDES Resolution. I thought it would be interesting with Challenger’s anniversary to take a moment and reflect upon the mission of each research vessel to see how their missions are different between the two ships and over time.

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11 February 2022

February birthdays – the discipline of oceanography and early NOAA organizations

The month of February is a month with some significant beginnings in ocean science

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28 January 2011

Remembering Challenger

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Challenger shuttle explosion. I was too young to remember the disaster, but it has had a lasting effect on our space program, and I certainly remember the Columbia disaster which occurred when I was an undergraduate. It’s tempting when these sorts of things happen to say that space exploration is too dangerous and too hard and that we should turn back. But that’s exactly the wrong response.

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