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14 January 2020

Final images from Cassini spacecraft

For the last leg of its journey, Cassini was put on a particularly daring orbit passing between Saturn and its rings which brought it closer to Saturn than ever before. This allowed scientists to obtain images of Saturn’s ultraviolet auroras in unprecedented resolution. The new observations are detailed in two new studies published in the AGU journals.

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27 December 2018

Rings make Saturn shadier, bluer and less hazy in winter

Saturn’s rings act like Venetian blinds that block sunlight for the hemisphere that’s tilted farther away from the Sun, limiting winter sunlight. This cuts down on the planet’s haze and golden glow.

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24 October 2018

Researchers describe likely origin of perfect lines on Saturn’s moon

Strange features on Saturn’s moon Dione resembling lines of latitude on a map could be the result of space dust crashing onto Dione’s surface, according to a new study. The streaks have puzzled scientists because of their orientation and straightness, but a new study finds these features, deemed linear virgae, likely originated from low-velocity impacts of space debris from within the Saturn system or beyond.

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9 July 2018

Listen: The sound of electromagnetic energy moving between Saturn, Enceladus

New research from Cassini’s up-close Grand Finale orbits shows a surprisingly powerful and dynamic interaction of plasma waves moving from Saturn to its moon Enceladus and its rings.

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21 June 2016

Saturn moon Enceladus’ ice shell likely thinner than expected

A vast ocean of water beneath the icy crust of Saturn’s moon Enceladus may be more accessible than previously thought, according to new research. A new study has revealed that near the moon’s poles, the ice covering Enceladus could be just two kilometers (one mile) thick—the thinnest known ice shell of any ocean-covered moon. The discovery not only changes scientists’ understanding of Enceladus’ structure, but also makes the moon a more appealing target for future exploration, according to the study’s authors.

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17 December 2015

Scientists Map Titan’s Lakes, Revealing Clues to their Origins

As Saturn’s largest moon, Titan earns its name. It’s also the only known body other than Earth with seas, numerous surface lakes, and even rainy weather. Now scientists have mapped out Titan’s polar lakes for the first time, revealing information about the moon’s climate and surface evolution. They found that the lakes formed differently than had been previously thought—and differently than any lakes on Earth.

A collaboration of scientists led by Alexander Hayes of Cornell University presented their findings at the 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. They used NASA’s Cassini spacecraft to penetrate Titan’s smoggy atmosphere and probe the complex lake systems below.

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13 November 2013

The Most Amazing Space Picture Of The Year

I know others have blogged this today, but for those that missed it… and an annotated version- WOW!    

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20 July 2013

A Lonely Speck In The Great Enveloping Cosmic Dark

Hat tip to Maksim Kakitsev who processed the raw images before NASA even. Here is the image of Earth and Saturn taken by Cassini  around 5:30 PM Friday July 19, 2013. The sun was behind Saturn, and Earth is the bright pixel below the rings. This is the second version taken by Cassini showing our small spinning fragment of solar driftwood.. The first image like this was taken by Voyager …

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