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You are browsing the archive for british columbia glacier disappearing Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

27 April 2020

Vern Ritchie-Battle Glacier, British Columbia Retreat, Lake Growth, Snowline Rise

Vern Ritchie (VR) and Battle Glacier (B) in 1987 and 2019 landsat images.  Three proglacial lakes have expanded at Points 2-5. WN=West Nunatak Glaier, Y=Yakutat Glacier N=Novatak Glacier, purple dots indicate snowline and green arrows indicate glacier flow direction. Vern Ritchie and Battle Glacier flow from the Alaska/Canada border of the St. Elias Mountains towards the Alsek River. In 1987 the two glaciers that share both an accumulation zone and …

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16 December 2019

Stave River, BC Run of River Hydropower Changes with Glacier Retreat

Stave Glacier area in 1992 and 2019 Landsat images illustrating the loss of glacier area.  Red arrows indicate 1992 terminus location, yellow arrow 2019 terminus location, Point 1-3 are proglacial lake that are evolving, P=Piluk Glacier and S=Stave Glacier. Stave River drains into Stave Lake and has a 40 km length above the lake.  The basin has a glaciated area of 32 km2. The basin above Stave Lake has two …

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1 April 2019

Nakonake Glaciers, BC Retreat Two are Disappearing

Nakonake Glaciers in 1984 and 2018 Landsat images. Nakonake Glaciers are NW=Northwest, N=North, M=Middle, S=South, SE=Southeast.  Red arrows indicate the 1984 terminus position of the North and Middle Nakonake Glaciers.  Yellow arrows indicate the 2018 terminus location of each. Purple dots indicate the snowline and the pink arrow indicates locations of glacier separation. The Nakonake Glaciers are a group of unnamed glaciers at the headwaters of the Nakonake River in …

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11 October 2016

Shatter & Shudder Glacier Retreat, British Columbia Lakes Form

Red arrow is the 1985 terminus location and yellow arrow the 2016 terminus location.  Note the formatiion of new lakes at end of both glaciers. Purple dots is the transient snowline in August of each year. Shatter and Shudder Glacier are at the eastern end of the Spearhead Range in Garibaldi Provincial Park, British Columbia. Osborn et al (2007) mapped the Little Ice Age extent of the glaciers compared to …

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23 June 2016

Canadian Columbia Basin Glacier Spring 2016 Field Season (winter 2015-2016 Assessment)

Guest Post by Ben Pelto, PhD Candidate, UNBC Geography, [email protected] During the spring season we visited our four study glaciers (Figure 1), which form a transect of the Columbia Mountains from the Kokanee Glacier in the Selkirk Range to the south, to the Conrad (Purcells) and Nordic (Selkirks) in the center, to the Zillmer of the Premier Range in the north. This post will explore the snowpack of winter 2016 across …

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17 November 2015

Cummins Glacier Fragmentation, British Columbia

  Comparison of the Cummins Glacier from 1986 to 2015.  Purple arrows indicate upglacier thinning and disconnection. Red arrow indicates 1986 terminus position.  Note the lack of snowcover in 2015.  The Cummins Glacier is part of the Clemenceau Icefield Group in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia. The Cummins Glacier via the Cummins River feeds the 430 square kilometer Kinbasket Lake, on the Columbia River.  The lake is impounded by the 5,946 MW Mica …

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8 October 2015

Yoho Glacier, British Columbia Accumulation Zone Woes

Yoho Glacier in 2005 no accumulation zone in sight. Yoho Glacier is the largest southern outflow draining the south from the Wapta Icefield in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. It flows 6.5 km from the 3125 m to a terminus at 2200 m. The glacier terminus reach is thin, gently sloping  and uncrevassed poised for continued retreat. An exploration of Mount Balfour in 1898 a party led by Professor …

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