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5 August 2022

#AntarcticLog: Greetings from the Puerto Rico Trench

Greetings from the deepest place in the Atlantic Ocean!  So far I’m reporting from the surface, but every day human-operated vehicle (HOV) Alvin carries scientists deeper. I mean, if you knew you had access to 99% of the seafloor — where before you had access to 2/3 — wouldn’t you head for the deepest spots?

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29 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Down with Alvin

Down with Alvin!  That’s where the scientists aboard R/V Atlantis are headed.  As Alvin Science Verification Expedition chief scientist Adam Soule says, “our human brain is good at seeing what’s different in an environment — anything from organic shapes to unusual colors.” 

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22 July 2022

#AntarticLog: To sea we go!

And now for something completely different. #AntarcticLog heads to the deep sea, where carbon sinks, where the sea is black, and where the tiny submersible Alvin — able to carry three people — will soon be shining its light on unseen territory. 

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8 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Invisible Volcanoes

Artist Karen Roman Young shows us what we can learn about the below-ice geology of Marie Byrd Land in Antarctica.

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1 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Six years of science comics

Karen Romano Young shares highlights of her (now six!) years of drawing the Antarctic Log.

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24 June 2022

#AntarcticLog: Picturing time

How do you picture time? Does that seem like a strange notion? Not to a visual storyteller like me. Is time a wheel? a sphere? a line? a line with wrinkles? (Don’t forget, I’m a children’s book author, too.)  

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17 June 2022

#AntarcticLog: Advocating on behalf of coral

Presenting…Cindi Punihaole, the Program Director of ReefTeach, a coral reef advocate — making a public policy difference as well as a personal impact — at Kahalu’u Bay, Mission Blue newest Hope Spot.  Cindi — who has lived and relied on the Bay all her life, has observed the changes taking place there over recent decades, as the sea level has risen, sea temperature and acidity have soared, and the number of tourists visiting the Big Island of Hawaii has skyrocketed. 

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10 June 2022

#AntarcticLog: Hanging loose in Hawaii

Aloha! I’ve arrived in Hawaii, and am writing this on the lanai of my tiny rental cottage in a grove of coffee trees.  The sea is two miles below; we’re just “up mauka” (uphill) of Kahalu’u Beach Park, the newest Mission Blue Hope Spot, set aside for special efforts to maintain its waters, and the coral beneath. What’s threatening them? Sea temperature rise, ocean acidification, pollution from land, and yes, snorkeling. 

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3 June 2022

#AntarcticLog: Headed for Hawaii

Serendipity? My tickets to the big island of Hawaii were already bought when I read that the international nonprofit organization Mission Blue had designated its 141st Hope Spot — Hawaii’s second — right where I was headed. For the next couple of weeks, I’ll be learning about — and posting about — the changes taking place on Kahalu’u Bay.  

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23 May 2022

#AntarcticLog: Communicating climate science

I’ve been listening to teachers, and reading their words. They’re overtired, overworked, underpaid, and, when it comes to science teachers, extra worried: they’re concerned about the hard line that has been drawn by many people against science. 

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13 May 2022

#AntarcticLog: It’s tough getting to Antarctica

I think we’ve established that it’s not easy to get to Antarctica. Ever since the Drake Passage opened ten million years ago, letting the Southern Ocean circle the Antarctic continent, it has rendered human arrival there perilous and arduous.

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6 May 2022

#AntarcticLog: A Reef Called HOPE

#AntarcticLog is a series of comics by Karen Romano Young. You can find the originals here. You know, writing about climate change is a struggle.  I want to share the information kids and other people need (in my view) while trying not to send their outlook through the floor.  Among the most dire stories come from coral reefs — so vital, so damaged, and so at risk.  And yet there’s incredible …

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29 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: A small piece about a big deal

Artist Karen Romano Young explains through SciArt why tiny krill are a big deal for Antarctic food webs (and penguins, seals, orcas–and scientists).

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22 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: Watch Your Language

#AntarcticLog is a series of comics by Karen Romano Young. You can find the originals here. Last week I posted about how I try to find the best visual image to convey the main point of a comic or visual story.  This week I’m sharing just one image — an introduction to the JOIDES Resolution and Expedition #379, in which I took part three years ago, in 2019. I continue to …

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15 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: Getting Graphic

At times the trouble isn’t finding science stories, it’s finding how to tell them. In comics, the words are vital, but the images are, dare I say, even more important.  Why? Because they’re what catches your attention, clues you in, inviting you to read, and — in the best cases — they work to convey aspects of the science that just wouldn’t work as well in words. And, as experts in science education and communication know, the more modes you use to tell the story, the more eyes you’re going to get on your work. 

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8 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: Not just for kids

Illustrated stories are for kids, right? Not right at all! People of all ages read, laugh and cry over, learn from, and love pictures.  

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1 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: A Lite-Brite of SciArt

I got my start at Scholastic News, a classroom magazine for 11 and 12-year-olds that covered everything — so I had to interview everyone who was making news. I quickly realized that the people I liked talking to the most were scientists. They were the most passionate, the most enthralled, and they had the biggest lives — even as they focused on a small research topic or specific geographic area. To me they were dots of light that — like the Lite-Brite toy I’d grown up with — formed pictures. 

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18 March 2022

#AntarcticLog: (Climate) refugees

Sometimes there just aren’t words to express my response to what’s going on. That’s what led me to comics in the first place — a grievous story of walrus stranded by climate change — and it’s what leads me on. What “does not compute” in words can make a connection in visuals. 

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11 March 2022

#AntarcticLog: Coming together for science

My Twitter feed is full of calls for peace. And last week’s #AntarcticLog post had a call for “more science!” Coming right up. Actually, Antarctica is proof that we can have peace and science, and that the countries of the world can come together to secure it. 

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4 March 2022

#AntarcticLog: A season at Palmer Station

Palmer is on Anvers Island on the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, a prime location for biology, such as Oregon State University researcher Thomas DesVignes’ study of icefish, aided by fishing from the deck of the Laurence M. Gould. Palmer’s supply ship…

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