Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for new hampshire Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

3 September 2018

Monday Geology Picture: Heavy Mineral Lag

Life has been busy, so once again I’ve been negligent with blogging. Let’s see if I can do better for the rest of the year. To start, here’s a beautiful picture of a heavy mineral lag on a beach in New Hampshire. The red garnets show up particularly well. The heavier minerals, including garnets, have concentrated behind a log on a lakeside beach. Wave action has winnowed the lighter minerals …

Read More >>


4 March 2016

Friday fold: Mount Monadnock, New Hampshire

It’s Friday, so in search of an appropriate fold, Joe Kopera leads us to the top of New Hampshire’s Mt. Monadnock. Bonus: boudinage!

Read More >>


22 September 2015

Monday Geology Picture: Glacial Erratics and a Stone Wall, Fox Forest, New Hampshire

Continuing with my recent blogging themes of stone walls and glacial erratics, here is a picture of a stone wall in Fox Forest in New Hampshire. This stone wall was built out of glacial erratics and incorporates a large glacial erratic that was most likely left in situ… that is, left more or less where the glacier deposited it. Today, the stone wall is located in the middle of a …

Read More >>


15 September 2015

Monday Geology Picture: Glacial Erratic Boulder, New Hampshire

I’m visiting family in New Hampshire at the moment… and also spending a little time with my favorite glacial erratic. I’ve posted about this particular glacial erratic before here and here. For this week’s Monday Geology Picture post I thought I’d share another shot of this stunning glacially deposited boulder. Enjoy!

Read More >>


8 September 2015

Monday Geology Picture(s): Stone Wall in a New Hampshire Forest

I have been highly negligent in my blog writing recently. I hope to make up for that over the next few months… starting with writing my “Monday Geology Picture” posts regularly again. For this week’s picture I’m sharing a picture that I took today in Deering, New Hampshire. The picture shows an old stone wall, now partly covered over by forest. Here in New England one often runs across old stone …

Read More >>


15 December 2014

Monday Geology Picture: A Glacial Erratic in the New Hampshire Woods

I spent the last two weeks of November visiting my family in New Hampshire. While I was in the US, I went on some long jogs and walks and took pictures of some glacial erratics, which can be found all around the Mervine Family Cabin in southern New Hampshire. This week’s “Monday Geology Picture” features a glacial erratic in the woods just down the road from the cabin. This large, …

Read More >>


9 September 2013

Monday Geology Picture(s): More Glacial Erratics on the Lake

Last week, I shared a picture of me sunbathing by my favorite glacial erratic, which is located near the Mervine Family Cabin on Franklin Pierce Lake in New Hampshire. This week, I thought I’d share a few more pictures of glacial erratics on Franklin Pierce Lake. Note the large sizes of these erratics and also how many of them are fairly angular. The erratics are mostly igneous and metamorphic rocks, …

Read More >>


2 September 2013

Monday Geology Picture: Sunbathing by My Favorite Glacial Erratic

Happy Labor Day to all of my American readers! I hope that you all enjoy the holiday. Weather permitting, I plan on spending some time sunbathing by my favorite glacial erratic. I’m currently on vacation in New Hampshire and Cape Cod for about a week. I just finished up six weeks of field work in Alaska. My husband and I also visited New Hampshire for a couple of days on …

Read More >>


24 September 2012

Monday Geology Picture(s): My Favorite Glacial Erratic

New England is full of glacial erratics: rocks which were transported and dropped by glaciers and which have a different lithology from the rocks upon which they have been deposited. Often, erratic rocks have an angular shape because they were broken off of bedrock by glaciers and have not yet had time to be weathered and rounded by water, wind, and other erosional forces. Glacial erratics can range in size …

Read More >>


11 June 2012

Monday Geology Picture(s): Building Stones in Rollins Chapel

Last week my husband and I visited my alma mater Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Dartmouth has a beautiful campus, and one of my favorite buildings on the campus is Rollins Chapel. The chapel is a multi-faith spiritual center that is used by students and alumni for a variety of purposes. The chapel is used for spiritual services, quiet reflection, weddings, seminars, speeches, and other events. When I was a …

Read More >>


30 May 2012

Georneys with Dana, Part VI: Dana’s First Kayaking Trip

Note: I convinced my Geokittehs co-author Dana Hunter to fly from Seattle to New Hampshire to visit me for a few days. I handed in the final version of my PhD thesis on Friday May 4th, and Dana arrived the next day to help me celebrate. This is Part VI of my description of the fun georneys we had together during Dana’s visit. This is also the last post in my series about Dana’s visit. …

Read More >>


28 May 2012

Georneys with Dana- Part V: The Garnet Road

I apologize for a bit of a hiatus in posting. There were some technical troubles with the AGU blogs, and then my husband and I were down in Florida for five days. Blogging may continue to be somewhat light for the next few weeks, but I’ll post when I’m able. First, I’ll finish up my “Georneys with Dana” series. Then, I’ll post a bit about the trip to Florida. Note: I …

Read More >>


14 May 2012

Monday Geology Picture: Lakeside Geologist Lair

All good evil geologists need a  family cabin super sekrit lair. Most geologists prefer volcano lairs, but since there aren’t any volcanoes in New Hampshire, I’m making do (for now) with a lakeside lair. Once I return to my South African lair in a month or so, my geologist husband and I are going to start saving up for our volcanic island lair. Currently, I’m peacefully enjoying working very hard on …

Read More >>


12 May 2012

Georneys with Dana- Part III: The Chesterfield Gorge

Note: I convinced my Geokittehs co-author Dana Hunter to fly from Seattle to New Hampshire to visit me for a few days. I handed in the final version of my PhD thesis last Friday afternoon, and Dana arrived last Saturday to help me celebrate. This is Part III of my description of the fun georneys we had together during Dana’s visit. After our visits to the dinosaur footprints and The Rock, Fossil, & …

Read More >>


1 May 2012

Monday Geology Picture: Chesterfield Gorge, New Hampshire

This week’s geology picture was taken in the Chesterfield Gorge, which is located just a few minutes from my parents’ house in southern New Hampshire. I would often explore and play at the gorge as a child. I used to like to throw things into the gorge and watch them go over the waterfalls. I once duct-taped a Princess Leia figurine into a plastic toy kayak and watched her go …

Read More >>