Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Landslide processes Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

8 July 2022

Shifting the blame for the deadly landslide at Tupul in India

The Tupul landslide occurred at the site of a major construction project involving slope excavation, but officials are blaming poor farming methods for the failure

Read More >>


7 July 2022

The role of climate change in the May 2022 landslides in Pernambuco, Brazil

A new attribution study indicates that climate change is likely to have been a factor in the Pernambuco landslides in Brazil

Read More >>


31 March 2022

The mechanisms of the Derrybrien peatslide

An Environmental Impact Assessment published online details the mechanisms of failure of the 2003 Derrybrien peatslide in Ireland.

Read More >>


13 December 2021

The failure of retaining walls

An interesting video discusses modes of failure of retaining walls

Read More >>


11 June 2021

Chamoli, Indian Himalaya: A massive rock and ice avalanche caused the 2021 disaster

A massive rock and ice avalanche caused the 2021 disaster at Chamoli, Indian Himalaya: our new paper explaining the sequence of events has been published in the journal Science

Read More >>


12 April 2021

The interesting morphology of the Culluchaca landslide in Peru

The interesting morphology of the Culluchaca landslide in Peru – is this part of a much larger deep-seated gravitational deformation (DSGD)?

Read More >>


18 March 2021

Retrogressive breach failures

Retrogressive breach failures, are coastal flow slides that occur naturally in fine sands near dynamic tidal channels or rivers

Read More >>


3 July 2020

The Dawn of Hope peat slide: understanding the source area

John Flynn’s remarkable drone video of Dawn of Hope peat slide suggests that this might have been a bog burst that underwent retrogression

Read More >>


12 May 2020

The Váráš rock slope deformation in northern Norway

The Váráš rock slope deformation in Troms County in northern Norway, a 70 million cubic metre, 100 m deep creeping landslide.

Read More >>


13 February 2020

The fast-moving Alpine Gardens landslide in New Zealand

The Alpine Gardens landslide in New Zealand in the Fox Glacier Valley is moving at over 11 millimetres per day, generating large debris flows

Read More >>


2 July 2019

The huge September 2018 Naga landslide in the Philippines: a first published analysis

A first analysis of the mining-induced September 2018 Naga landslide, which killed 134 people and destroyed almost 60 houses

Read More >>


21 May 2019

Joffre Peak: precursory movements and the role of temperature

The first Joffre Peak landslide was probably associated with high Spring temperatures, but the slope also showed signs of distress before the collapse.

Read More >>


19 February 2019

New on EarthArXiv: a first analysis of the flank failure of the Anak Krakatau volcano

A paper has recently been posted to EarthArXiv providing an analysis of the flank failure of Anak Krakatau on 22 Dec 2018, which generated a tsunami that killed 431 people.

Read More >>


10 October 2018

Two developing large landslides – Mannen (again) and Diamante

News today of two large, developing slope instabilities, one at Diamante in Argentina and the other at Mannen, yet again, in Norway

Read More >>


8 February 2018

Predicting failure using ground-based radar and INSAR

In a new paper in Engineering Geology, Carla et al (2018) demonstrate how a combination of ground-based radar and INSAR could have been used to predict a major landslide in a copper mine

Read More >>


6 February 2018

The first submarine sackungen: a new paper

A paper just published in Geo-Marine Letters, Conway and Barrie 2018 – describes a new landslide type – the submarine sackungen – observed in the flanks of Douglas Channel in British Columbia

Read More >>


29 January 2018

Rattlesnake Hills rockslide – anticipating future behaviour

The Rattlesnake Hills rockslide in Washington State continues to creep at an approximately constant rate. The key challenge now is to determine whether the slide can transition into a rapid failure eventThe Rattlesnake Hills rockslide in Washington State continues to creep at an approximately constant rate. The key challenge now is to determine whether the slide can transition into a rapid failure event

Read More >>


3 October 2017

Murchison Hut: an interesting landslide problem in Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park

Murchison Hut: a skiers and climbers refuge closed by a large, progressive rockslide in Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park in South Island, New Zealand

Read More >>


31 August 2017

The Maca landslide: a large, slow-moving slide in Peru

In an article this week in Nature, Jane Palmer describes the Maca landslide, a 60 million cubic metre slow-moving slide in Peru

Read More >>


15 December 2016

On the difference between prediction and foresight in landslide hazard assessment

The assessment of the likely future behaviour of a slope is very difficult. Whilst prediction of behaviour may be impossible, it can often be foreseen

Read More >>