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6 March 2019

Third Pod Live: James Balog, Adventurer

In part two of this three-part series, we were fortunate to be able to sit down with James Balog to talk about some of his most memorable (and dangerous) moments in the field.

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4 March 2019

Third Pod Live: James Balog, Photographer

In part one of this three-part series, we were fortunate to be able to sit down with James Balog to talk about how he became a photographer.

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18 June 2018

Monday Geology Picture: Greenland View

I recently flew from London to Vancouver, and the views as we flew over the northern part of the globe were spectacular. I particularly enjoyed flying over Greenland, a country largely covered by ice and snow. I spent a good hour or so looking at the white landscapes, which only provided glimpses of the rocky landscape underneath – generally dark rocks peeking through the white and sometimes, it seemed, directing …

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9 May 2018

E5 – Bonus Clip: Wildlife of Svalbard

Check out this clip that didn’t make it into our recent episode, Journey to the Center of the Ice, with glaciologist Kiya Riverman, about her close encounters with animals of the far north.

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1 May 2018

E5 – Journey to the Center of the Ice

From the outside, glaciers appear to be solid masses of unmoving ice. But meltwater flowing from the surface down to the glacier bed carves canyons, gorges and even caves into the dense sheets of ice. Over time, the fissures form labyrinthine tunnels that open into vast ice caverns few people have ever seen.

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23 November 2016

A conversation with Zack Labe

Yesterday, I mentioned climate change visualizer extraordinaire Zack Labe. As delineated then, he’s a PhD student at U.C. – Irvine in the Earth Systems Science department. He’s producing some really excellent #dataviz on climate change. Today, I’d like to share a short exchange I had with Zack about his work. 1)      Please give Mountain Beltway readers a sense of your background, leading up to what you’re working on …

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22 November 2016

We are in unprecedented territory with global sea ice

The amount of sea ice on planet Earth is much, much lower than ever recorded at this time of year. Will this anomaly turn out to be a relatively minor “weather” event? Or is this what a sea ice tipping point looks like?

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26 May 2016

Glaciotectonic thrust at Waubonsee Community College

Glaciers can cause thrust faults! Explore an example from a trench south of Chicago.

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7 January 2015

Geology Word of the Week: I is for Ice

def. Ice: Water (H2O) in a solid state. When naturally occurring, ice is considered a mineral. There are many forms of ice: lake ice, river ice, sea ice, snow, glaciers, ice caps, ice sheets, and frozen ground (such as permafrost).   If you ask a geologist what he or she considers to be Earth’s most important mineral, you will probably hear many different answers, depending on the person. Some might …

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5 July 2012

Floe Lake hike

Last summer, my wife and I spent some time in the Canadian Rockies. One of the things we did was to take a three-day backpacking trip to Floe Lake, in Kootenay National Park, British Columbia. We picked a rough couple of days for hiking – We got a lot of Canadian Rockies precipitation out there: we got rained on, hailed on, and snowed on during those three days. Here’s our …

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