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28 August 2017

Communicating uncertainty in research to the public

By Madeleine Jepsen. This is the second of a two-part series on communicating uncertainty.  Whether it’s a congressman drafting legislation or a family member asking about your research at Thanksgiving dinner, explaining uncertainty in research to a lay audience is an important part of science communication. Recently, Joseph Guillaume, a postdoctoral fellow at Aalto University, published an analysis of how uncertainty is verbally communicated in scientific publications using abstracts from …

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23 August 2017

Communicating uncertainty in research papers

What do scientists mean when they say “uncertainty?”

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4 August 2017

Do you wanna write a blog post?!

We’re looking guest contributors to our blog!

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24 July 2017

Humanizing scientists via #AlongsideScience

Scientists have interests outside of science. #AlongsideScience helps to showcase those interests.

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3 July 2017

Blogging about diseases – for science! (And fun.)

By Shane M Hanlon I’m a disease ecologist by training. As a graduate student I investigated how agricultural runoff, mainly in the form of pesticides, alters the effects of fungal disease in amphibians. I still collaborate on primarily disease-related projects with my peers. And, as an added bonus, I get to spend three weeks each summer teaching a disease ecology course at Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology (- the place where …

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19 June 2017

Wait, what’s #scijack & what’s it have to do with #scicomm?

By Shane M Hanlon Over the past month, I have noticed a new type of #scicomm emerging. It’s not through a new technology, rather, it’s exploiting an existing one. Spurred by the Tweets of President Donald Trump, scientists and science-enthusiasts alike have begun to insert science facts, or #scijack, into tweet threads responding to President Trump, as well as other prominent political figures. The idea is this – many, many …

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8 June 2017

Scientists Find Clouds full of Lollipop-Shaped Crystals

Some clouds are filled with lollipops (not really, but close)! A new Drawn to Geoscience by JoAnna Wendel.

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6 June 2017

So…you wanna host a Twitter takeover?

By Shane M Hanlon Recently, a new word has entered my lexicon: rocur. I’ve actually had discussions with colleagues responsible for copy editing and marketing about using this word, mainly along the lines of, “that’s not a word.” This has made me realize I’ve migrated from one bubble of scientific research in conservation biology to another that’s focused on communication, policy, and social media. So what does “rocur” mean? Well, …

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24 May 2017

Lucy Jones: scientists need to create “scientifically-defensible” stories

Scientists have an obligation to communicate what they know in a way that ensures it can be understood and acted upon by policymakers, seismologist Lucy Jones told attendees at the JpGU-AGU joint meeting this week.

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15 May 2017

Our power to inspire and encourage

By Janine Krippner As soon as I learned that ‘volcanologist’ was a real job, I wanted to be one. I knew no scientists in my hometown of Te Awamutu, New Zealand, but I was lucky enough to have a Mum who told me I could be anything I wanted to be. Not everyone gets that kind of encouragement, though, and that’s why I think it’s important for those of us …

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