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20 March 2017

Facebook Live for #scicomm

Facebook Live for #scicomm

By Shane M Hanlon There are so many venues for science communication, especially when it comes to social media. For example, AGU alone has four official Twitter accounts (Sharing Science, AGU, Eos, Science Policy), an Instagram account, and a half-dozen Facebook pages. Social media is a powerful venue for communicating tips on communication. Twitter is an especially great place to learn about #scicomm resources and opportunities through hashtags like #scicomm, …

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8 March 2017

#MySciComm: Dr. Shane Hanlon

#MySciComm: Dr. Shane Hanlon

Wonder how to get into a career in #scicomm? Our own Shane M Hanlon shares his journey. Hint – it was not direct.

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6 March 2017

Considerations for Strategically & Effectively Communicating Your Science

Considerations for Strategically & Effectively Communicating Your Science

By Lauren Childs-Gleason Science is inherently exciting. Exploring new frontiers and discovering intricacies of dynamic systems that enhance our understanding of the planet, improves the quality of our lives. That is awesome and exciting. Yet sometimes scientific communication can be uninspiring – the stereotypical bespectacled professor wearing a lab coat and droning on about equations comes to mind. How do we not be boring? How do we communicate more effectively …

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3 March 2017

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions – Final Thoughts

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions - Final Thoughts

By Christy Till. This is the 3rd part in a 3-part series in which a US scientist reflects on the women’s march, making sense of the current political landscape, and finding answers in local science communication activities. See part one here and two here.   “Polarizing people is a good way to win an election, and also a good way to wreck a country.”  – Molly Ivins Perhaps some of the …

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1 March 2017

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions- So…Now What?

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions- So...Now What?

A US scientist’s reflections on the women’s march, making sense of the current political landscape, and finding answers in local science communication activities – Part 2.

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27 February 2017

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions – Reflections from the Women’s March in DC

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions - Reflections from the Women’s March in DC

A US scientist’s reflections on the women’s march, making sense of the current political landscape, and finding answers in local science communication activities.

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21 February 2017

Science communication needs you

Science communication needs you

We need scientists to meet with legislators, speak at public events, and foster relationships with journalists. Will that be you?

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13 February 2017

We are all citizens of science

We are all citizens of science

By Shane M Hanlon “Science surrounds us.” “In order to be a good science communicator, you must first be a good science consumer.” “SciComm: you don’t have to like it but you need to be able to do it.” These are all things I’ve said in the age of Twitter where space is at a premium and effective messaging is critical. They pertain to the different hats that I wear – producer …

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30 January 2017

Enhance Your Science With Social Media: No…Really

Enhance Your Science With Social Media: No...Really

By Hanna Goss Two years ago, a scientist told me he wasn’t interested in social media because he thought it was a fad. That myth was shattered after social media played such a huge role in the recent U.S. election. Social media is powerful. What may not be as obvious is it can be a meaningful tool for you to enhance your science. After almost 20 years of being a …

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23 January 2017

The Wikipedia Year of Science Comes to AGU16

The Wikipedia Year of Science Comes to AGU16

Rather than complain about Wikipedia, scientists at AGU16 decided to do something about it.

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