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3 July 2017

Blogging about diseases – for science! (And fun.)

By Shane M Hanlon I’m a disease ecologist by training. As a graduate student I investigated how agricultural runoff, mainly in the form of pesticides, alters the effects of fungal disease in amphibians. I still collaborate on primarily disease-related projects with my peers. And, as an added bonus, I get to spend three weeks each summer teaching a disease ecology course at Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology (- the place where …

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19 June 2017

Wait, what’s #scijack & what’s it have to do with #scicomm?

By Shane M Hanlon Over the past month, I have noticed a new type of #scicomm emerging. It’s not through a new technology, rather, it’s exploiting an existing one. Spurred by the Tweets of President Donald Trump, scientists and science-enthusiasts alike have begun to insert science facts, or #scijack, into tweet threads responding to President Trump, as well as other prominent political figures. The idea is this – many, many …

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8 June 2017

Scientists Find Clouds full of Lollipop-Shaped Crystals

Some clouds are filled with lollipops (not really, but close)! A new Drawn to Geoscience by JoAnna Wendel.






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6 June 2017

So…you wanna host a Twitter takeover?

By Shane M Hanlon Recently, a new word has entered my lexicon: rocur. I’ve actually had discussions with colleagues responsible for copy editing and marketing about using this word, mainly along the lines of, “that’s not a word.” This has made me realize I’ve migrated from one bubble of scientific research in conservation biology to another that’s focused on communication, policy, and social media. So what does “rocur” mean? Well, …

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24 May 2017

Lucy Jones: scientists need to create “scientifically-defensible” stories

Scientists have an obligation to communicate what they know in a way that ensures it can be understood and acted upon by policymakers, seismologist Lucy Jones told attendees at the JpGU-AGU joint meeting this week.






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15 May 2017

Our power to inspire and encourage

By Janine Krippner As soon as I learned that ‘volcanologist’ was a real job, I wanted to be one. I knew no scientists in my hometown of Te Awamutu, New Zealand, but I was lucky enough to have a Mum who told me I could be anything I wanted to be. Not everyone gets that kind of encouragement, though, and that’s why I think it’s important for those of us …

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8 May 2017

Communicating science: four strategies to get the message across

By Mafalda Marques Carapuço Science communication is a challenging task as there is no universal solution that can be used in all cases. This is a major challenge for scientists who believe that communicating science to non-scientists is part of their social responsibility. To help scientists in the process of communicating science and fostering the transfer of scientific knowledge outside of the scientific community, four strategies can be adopted to …

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1 May 2017

Drawn to Geoscience: What makes a geyser go “FIZZSPLOOSH”?!

What makes a geyser blow? Our own JoAnna Wendel explains…in comic form!






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Heading to the field? Submit your Postcards from the Field!

By Shane M. Hanlon In mid-2014 we launched our Postcards from the Field campaign through our shiny-new Tumblr account where we asked you to share stories and photos from your field experiences. We’ve also created calendars from postcard images voted on by our members and the public. It’s that time of year again. Flowers are blooming, trees are greening, and scientists are prepping for field season.  /Whether you’re in the middle of a field season or preparing for …

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27 April 2017

Why some of the best March for Science signs were also the worst.

By Shane M Hanlon & Olivia V Ambrogio The March for Science was the largest gathering of scientists in our lifetimes (so far). Thousands of scientists turned out in cities around the world to stand up for strong science, and that was an impressive and inspiring thing to take part in. But a march isn’t just about the people, or the work they’ll (hopefully) continue to do afterwards to build …

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